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future plans would be. He stated in spite of anything he 
might have done in the past, he considers himself a loyal 
United States citizen and felt that information concerning 
the Panamanian situation should be a matter of which the 
United States State Department should be aware. 


Bureau's attention is called to Bureau airtel to 
Miami dated January 21 .1959 , captioned, "REUBEN OSCAR MXRO 
GUARDIA, IS - Panama," [ identifying this person as a CIA 


a 

n formant. This person^ it bas been established is identical 


with RUBEN MIRO who contacted MEROLA and it was felt at the 
time because of MIRO' s position in this matter, that he 
might be baiting MEROLA (jj 

On February 7, 1959T^EROLA informed he arrived 
Miami, 3:00 p.m., February 7, 1959, from Havana and was 
planning to depart at 10:25, same date, for return to Havana. 
MEROLA was advised of provisions of the Neutrality Act. 


MEROLA stated he occupies Apartment 30-N in the 
Frcsa Building, Havana, Cuba. 

Miami teletype to Bureau dated March 2, 1959, 
reflects MEROLA contacted that date and he had talked by 
overseas telephone, evening of February 27, 1959, with RUBEN 
KXRO who was in Havana. MEROLA said MIRO, in double talk 
oonversation confirmed fact that revolutionary group was 
ready to leave from Cuba during following week. This 
teletype also pointed out to Bureau that MEROLA is a 
suspect in connection with transportation of arms In case 
entitled, "STUART SUTOR, ETAL; Theft of Government Property," 
involving theft of arms from National Guard Armory, Canton, 
Ohio, October 14, 1958. On February 27, 1959, MEROLA was 
interviewed by FBI Agents, Miami, and was uncooperative in 
connection with this matter. MEROLA furnished information 
concerning Panamanian situation voluntarily and claimed to 
be one hundred per cent loyal United States citizen, and 


C - 



- COVER PAGE - 



Office M.erflh andum • united ^..es government 


TO 


A. H. Belmont 


from : g, Donahoe 


A 


- Bel 

- Dona 

- Little 




[ate: April 23, 1959 


SUBJECT 


^PANAMANIAN REV OL UTJ QN A gy ~ ^7TVXr.ZgS 
FOREIGN POLITICAL NATTERS - PANAMA 



A 


Boardman . 
Belmont 




tJelioach I 
McGuire 

V/.C. Si’lti'' 


Rosen . 
Tamm _ 


W.C. Sullivan _ 

Tele. Room 

Holloman 


On 4/20/59 JosepMMerola, who is presently under indictment 
for transporting in interstate commerce guns stolen from a National Guara 
armory in Canton, Ohio, and a suspectedjewel thief, advised Miami °ff£ ce 
Ruben Niro, a Panamanian revolutionarylapd a CIA source Pjfirrived in \n) (j) 
Miami on that date. Miro reportedly informed Merola a group of 150 
revolutionaries departed from Cuba at 9 <*•»• on 4/19/59 bound for 
Bocas del Toro, Panama , headed by Cesar Augustd^Vegd/^elegrino, a Cuban. 
According to Merbla/Miro stated the departure of the group wa 


/ 


According to Me roia, Miro ~ ~ 

authorized by Raui$astro, brother of Fidel Castro, present Prime Minister 
of Cuba . At 7:12 a.m., instant date, U. S. Navy advised that U. S. x 

Air'*¥orce aircraft reported radar shoioed formation of eight ships smaller . ^ 
than normal ocean vessels approximately 200 miles north °fj* anan ‘?‘ ' 

No direction of movement or speed of vessels possible. Fifteenth Nai 
District unable to evaluate. 

It is noted that the original information regarding the W 
invasion attempt was received by Bureau through our contact with Mtto la. ^ 
J jfiro is a CIA source but since he has been in Cuba, he has been out c 

contact with CIA. On 4/7/59 CIA advised Miro has served as a 
source of information but at no time has CIA controlled his octivitid^Jw 
nor has CIA been in a position to give him guidance Miro presently{jU r 
in New York and his activities are being followed. ^Se was interviewed ___ 
bu Miami Office 3/16/59 and stated he was not engaged in activities - 

in violation of laws in U. S. and declined to discuss activities in Cuba. 


\ ACTION: 


REC -69 


CIA HAS NO HfJ ifTTinM Tfl _ 

n m 28 »* 

,«n Ml n , REIEAS E * C-MmSm- —T 


None. The above is for your information 
109-12-223 

1 - 105-75663 (Ruben Miro) 

BWL:jlw dM* 

(5) I 

OtCUSSIFlEO BY -°V(l 

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APR 2S\1S5. C 


eSMAYi 1959 



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nUj iwnMuw.non corrtrvw 
axaxis h^ciAssinm 
tics? I s3»MnV. 

OTWKSISM - - ^ 



Reference copy, JFK Collection: HSCA (RG 233) 


■ Jgg ggg^g T 


- 5 


Physical guryeillance 

Mr. Osbom states that physical sur-.-eillar.ee of individuals in this country 
has teen very rare as far as the Office of Security is concerned. He doubts , 
that It has exceeded ten tires during his tenure in the Office of Security. 


He describes those circumstances under which s-ur.uillar.ee has been conducted 
as being limited to the following: 

1. CIA employees and contract agents believed to be divulging classified 
infonration to unauthorized persons; / 


^ ‘ to find out if he was getting information from current 

_Y employees of the CIA; 

3 ar.d another le cran to determine their sources 

of classifies! information, and a writer for the 

Washincrton Post, for the seme purpose; 


4. A female agent of the Latin American Division who reported to the CIA the 
existence of a plot to assassinate the Vice President and to kidnap the 
Director of Cental Intelligence. This surveillance was conducted under the 
supervision of Hr. Ober, of the Directorate of Operations, with the full 
knowledge of the FBI. 


Also included in this surveillance was seme of the contacts of this agent 
in Detroit, Miami, and New York City. The agent involved here was Thelma 
King, and the surveillance took place in 1971. (Mr. Osborn reports that 
a conversation between Miss King and her case officer in a New Yor.< hotel 
was also covertly recorded.) 


Mr. Osborn is eirohatic to the fact that every instance of phvsical surveillance 
in his experience was authorized by the Director of Central Intelligence except 
that Mr. Brcwrman, the Deputy Director for Administration, may have been the 
official to authorize the surveillance of employees, but it is possible that 
; these also were approved by Mr. Colby as DC I . Mr. Osbom is also emphatic to the 
effect that ro member of Congress has ever been placed under physical surveillance, 
has ever had his telephone tapped, has ever been covertly monitored with rescue^ 
to any conversations or ccmnuni cations^ or has ever had a security check performed 
on him by the CIA. 


Watergate Contacts 


1 . 


The McCord Letters: Mr. Osbom states that a letter directed^to Mr. 

in late June 1972 "was referred to his office as a part of the crank mail 
received that day. He recognized the signature on the letter as being that 
of a former employee of the Office of Security, Mr. . Mr * J 

had shortlv before that been arrested in connection with the breakin at thc^ 
Democratic National Ueadouarters on June 16, 1972. Mr. Osborn states that .e 
immediately brought this letter to the attention of Richard Helms, th- DC I. 


■TOP-GBCriTS i 



These all involved plotting in the United States for action L lake place 
against foreigners in foreign countries . The level o- approval of <hese 
projects could be critical, since the Federal Criminal Statute probably 
applicable is 18 U.S.C. 960 (expedition against friendly nation) - The 
language of the statute covers the preparation of any military or naval 
expedition to be carried on from the United States, but a 1917 case 
interpreted militar y or naval expedition to include such action by a 
single individual. 



II. Probable Violations of Agency Charter . 


1. Project MERRB4A.C, page 15. February 1967 - November 1971. 
Office of Security proprietary agents covertly monitored dissident groups 
in the Washington area considered potential threats to Agency installations 
and personnel In addition, Office of Security field offices collected intel- 
ligence on dissident groups . 

2. Project PARAGON, page 11 . Upon DCI approval of a Cl Staff 
request, the Office of Security surveilled Thelma King , a Latin American 
revolutionary, and several associates in New York City and Detroit. There 
•was surveillance and mail coverage of several American citizens in regard 
to a plot reported by Ms. King to assassinate Vice President Agnew and 
DCI. 

3. Project SIESTA and Project REDFACE I, see 1.3 and 4. 

4. Project CELLOTEX/1, page 12. Physical surveillance of Michael 
Geiler of the Washington Post , October 1971 - January 1972, to determine 
Geiier's source of classified information appearing in his columns. 



5. ProjactCELLQTEX/2, page 12. Surveillance of Jack Anderson, 
Britt Hume, Leslie Whitten, and Joseph Spear, 15 February —12. April 1972, 
to determine source of classified Agency information appearing in Anderson's 
syndicated columns. '■ .-V-' •' . 

6 . Project BUTANE, page 13. Surveillance cf Victor Marchetfi^- 
23 March - 20 April 1972 , at the direction of the DCI to determine his . 
activities and contacts with Agency employees and others m regard io 
his publications exposing Agency operations . 





“SUi'ilfT 


CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM 
RELEASE IN PJ^W9] 22 


MEMORANDUM FOR: Director of Security 



SUBJECT : Project ftUlA80!f - Information on Persons 

Associated with New Orleans Urban Guerrilla 
J Trou p 

REFERENCE : Our memorandum dated 3 August 1971, Subject: 

Project PARAOM E - Cathy STERN 


Attached are summaries of FBI information on individuals 
known to be associated with the New Orleans Urban Guerrilla 
Group mentioned in attachment A to reference . 


Attachments: A. Thetis Kathleen BRAGG 

B. Vernon Townes GRIZZARD 

C. Antonio NARANJO 

D. Hilary LNU 

E. Nathalie Marie MUSSON 

F. Frances HEBERT 

G. Wilfred CHAVEZ 





Based on: BRAGG, GRIZZARD, MUSSON 201 

DBD-07929 , 10 Mar 71 
Originated by: CI/SO:J^^ 

Distribution: 

Ori£ 6 1 ■ Addressee 


BRAGG 

GRIZZARD 

NARANJO 

LNU, Hilary 

MUSSON 

HEBERT 

CHAVEZ 

RO 






nrnnTT 

JLuutT 


Attachment F 


SUBJECT: Frances HEBERT 


Frances HEBERT works at the library of Delgado College 
in New Orleans£ and has allegedly developed ties with New 
Orleans District Attorney, James GARRISON . His wife may 
be Margaret HEBERT , who, according to the FBI, has power of 
attorney for Roxanne DUNBAR'S checking account, number 
3634-32-037 at the National Bank of Commerce in New Orleans. 


i 

t 


ornrinr . 

■ OTWlfflfr 



iSTORICAL REVIEW PRCS^.-i 




II 


( HZPA-13 , 960 

3 T • £ e- (o i 

20 1-0 0 J’lo 

she continued to be truthful, but that he obviously could make 
no prediction if she continued to be deceitful whenever it 
suited her purpose. Jt was at this point in the.j3ony£^jati.oja_ 
that the first news was received of GPIDE AL'jS death... This h ad 
ou nd" efTe c t onTSjSAGE-l ■ Her .first r§action_w.as_jtiiat,.J..t- 
aiust have been done" by racial extremists and she jspejnt_a__, 
con^derable time extolling the virtues of GPIDSAJ^and what he 
hrd~1jeen3^ do. • £_ / Jfwas in and out of the room during 
this time, so , operational discussion! was suspended. On his 
departure for .the National Assembly, he asked QtJSAGE-l to write 
a statement to be given in the Assembly that afternoon; she 
agreed to do so. When£. f ^finally departed, she, without 
any warning, took out of her pocketbook the tickets and papers 
for her trip to Red China and announced that in the face of 
this terrible happening, she could not possibly travel to Red 
China, whereupon she tore up the tickets and papers and burned 
them. * She then proceeded to write the eulogy, a copy of which 
was pouched to Headquarters in Reference A. 

3. PONCHAY did not meet again with fiJbAGE-l until 27 
Koveaber . This meeting took place during lunch at his home, 

produced nothing new of operational significance. L+j SAGE-1 
■pent, a great deal of time on what she had read in the press 
•nd what she had heard from other sources about the death of 
GPIDEAL, suggesting that there was a sinister plot being 
concealed by the police having to do with extreme right wing 
in PBPRIME. PONCHAY told her he was not going to listen to 
Communist propaganda and he hoped she was not going to let 
herself become a victim of such. He then cited to her briefly 
and bluntly the known facts and suggested she confine her 
thinking to that until further accurate information became 
available. She made quite a point of saying that she was . 
absolutely positive that AMTHUG-1 could have had nothing to. do ... 
jyith the act-.' PONCHAY made no comment in this regard, other 
|| than to say that speculation was dangerous unless based on fact. 

4 Comments on communications were reported through the 
Special Channel. The matter of the alleged ten TORUMEN organizers 
coming to Panama again arose. As in the past , £ejSAGE-l would 
give no positive information in this regard other than to say 
that she believed these people were due to arrive on or shortly, 
after December 1963, and that they would be travelling legally. 

At this point, PONCHAY does not know whether she has any details 
in this regard or whether she has fabricated the entire thing. 

The chances are that she has not, but it is most likely that 
has twisted some element of the story to confuse the true 
plan . 

5. During the meeting £?^SAGE— 1 also said she wanted to 
correct the statement that she had made some time ago to the 
effect that she believed one Mario VELASQUEZ had taken over 
the activities originally carried on by Diogenes PINO (para ID, 
Reference C. ) She^said she realized she had made a mistake in 
thJ.s and that VELASQUEZ was innocent of any involvement. PONCHAV 





Declassified and Approved for Release 
by the Central Intelligence Agency 

“ e: ■2&S/03 


8 / 6/98 


Barry, 


Per our conversation of this morning, and per Tenet’s recent instruction to 

search once again for information relevant to JFK’s assassi n ation, I think we need 

to call up the entire HYSAGE-1 ( c os 

Accor ding to Jake Esterline, in a phone conversation on the afternoon of S 
£itfe) 

August, be (Jake) was debriefing her and the meeting was interrupted by Sammy 
pnyn (P anamanian business leader) announcing JFK’s assassi n at i on. Q, } 

immediately broke down, began crying and said something to the effect of-they 
said they would not do it Jake tried to obtain more information but COST 
regained her composure and added nothing more. Jake is convinced that as they 
had been talking about Fidel, Che, Raid and PINIERO (head of Cuban 
intelligence), referring to them. Further, according to Jakc,£&£j at 

one time or another talked of meeting OSWALD, possibly in Cuba or elsewhere. 

Jake had reported the above information, but it was very closely held at the time 
so it may not have moved into the JFK material. 

C o*> J 





/JLcV iHfth 


fil IK. tVtdWll? 
jvjjLUi vgjujecS \ -C'- W 




^4 ffl«. it-M-tll 


FEOERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIC ION 
INTERVIEW REPORT 


Dot* 


12/15/59 


« 


On December 11, 1959, I. IRVING DAVIDSON 
telepbonically advised that RUBEK MIRO and LEOPOLDO ARAGON 
were present at his, DAVIDSON’S, offices whon he arrived at 
4:4S p.ra. Upon his arrival DAVIDSON stated that ARAGON 
advised that he, ARAGON, and UIRO did not see "oye to oye 
on things.” ARAGON said that although he is sympathetic 
with UIRO’s cause, that is, ♦he planned invasion to overthrow 
the Panamanian Government , ho loes not believe that the 
United States Government is going to do whatever MI..0 
wishes. 

DAVIDSON said he told UIRO and ARAGON that he 
checked with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and 
the United States Department of State and both tho FDI <> 

and the State Department are unaware as to the ”groon light 
for the Panama invasion. DAVIDSON stated at. this point 
that he told MIRO he was quite angry because MIRO was only 
talking about the "green light” backing by the United States. 
DAVIDSON advised that UIRO then wanted a long distance 
telephone call to be placed to on e£" 0U *7 telephone 

numberr*g *1 Panama City, Panama 7“ MIRO said that L ©*» J 
is an Agent for the Central Intelligence Agency and that 
MIRO’s code namo is QARL0S XVASQUE7 w hen dealing with 

I /Z-firn n"fi 

Although the telephone call 5 was placed it was 
without success. The call was then postponed until Monday, 
December 14,1959, and DAVIDSON stated it would be placed from 
his office at 10 a.m. 


MIRO -also stated that £ Ucarae from Panama 
to Miami iu April, 1959, and determined that UIRO was then 
In New York City. UIRO said that C. Q<» _7theu came, to 
New York to find MIRO and encourage an invasion plan by 
UIRO. 

It 

DAVIDSON stated that MIRO acted very discouraged 
at this December 11, 1959, meeting and requested that 
DAVIDSON try to arrange for a Job in Nicaragua so he. 


tnVnrww with 


I. IRVING DAVIDSON 


•n 12/11/59 Washington, D. C. 


ky Special A,wn. DONALD H0ET1N0 

FtOfxrtj of FBI - T iu report U turned U by l*« FBI . mtU 


c . f g VFO 97-1159 

rilt f - -7- 

Dot# diet at #J 12/14/59 

/bsb 

'I *■ 


to be dietribeted rn+taU* tbs 



ro-Mt(ltn. I 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIC ' 'M 
INTERVIEW REPORT 

12/17/59 


~r 


RUBEN OSCAR MIRO ClJJRDli, who resides in 

C., with hii sister , Mrs. PAULT1/A DE, at 
2901 Park Drive, S. E., was interviewed at thfe Washington 


Washington, D. C 


fdiR ^ • «•» "»•* vv * - r- 7 ^ 

Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

He was advised that he need cake no statement, that anv 
statement he made could be used against him, and that he 
had a right to legal counsel. 


MIRO advised he did not return to Panama in 
early October, 1959, as he had previously stated he planned 
to do, because he feared that if he were in Panama, he 
would be blamed, unjustifiably, for the continual demonstrations 
against the Panamanian Government. He said he has recently 
been engaged in an attempt to obtain employment with some 
international organi ration, either in the inited States, 
or somewhere outside of Panama, in Latin America. He said 
if he is successful in obtaining this employment, he dees 
not plan to return to Panama for at lease five years, but 
added he had no immediate prispects for such a job. 

MIKO was. specifically asked whether or not he 
had been attempting to obtain in the United States, financial • 
backing for an invasion of Panama iod claiming, in that 
regard, that he had been pr-wused that the United States 
Government would "look the other way," if such an invasion 
took place. He at first deniri that he had done either 
and later said that since he had been assured he would not 
have to say anything, he preferred to go on record as saying 
that he neither affirmed nor denied the allegations, but 
rather, refused to discuss them. 


When asked about C. ^ HIRO said he 
first met 1“ Pt n *®4- eround 1940, or 1941, when he 

defended r J», who was chargei as an accomplice in a • 
nurder c«r>c . He said he bcl! c ft ? associated with 

a United States intelligws agency because of his activities 
and apparent contacts, bu* denied that/; ofcJJ J 1 * 1 * told him 
the United States Government would "loos the other way," 
if MIRO instituted an in .a;o oa to overthrow the Panamanian 
Government. 


Interview with RUBEN OSCAR HIRO GUARD IA File t WFO 97-1159 

•a I2/l?/59 .1 Washington, D. C. Dote dictate J2/17JS: 


A t ents HERBERT J. MORGAN . JR. R ICHARD. ,£. KELLOGG ;ekh 


rnpinj ef FBI - rhu rtf art it loo~td u ;ee »7 tlr FBI, vU eriltcr a «r a, reMrU, 

afts cj Ur win* 


to b« 4i*t*Un*<4 o «*•(/« 



Declassified in Part - Sanitized Copy Approved for Release 2012/11/05 : CIA-RDP89G01321R000700340002-7 25X1 


military agrees to mandatory retirement after 25 years, Noriega 
would be forced to choose a more junior officer on the General 
Staff— such as Chief of Intelligence Wong or his relative 
Lieutenant Colonel Sieiro. The prospects of a purged officer, 

such as Lieutenant Colonel Herrera Hassan^beijig selected_as 

Defense Chief are extremely remote. 


* * * 


This paper discusses the degree of political power a new^ 
Defense Chief and the military would retain following Noriega s 
resignation and identifies possible successors to Noriega as 
Defense Chief. The assumption underlying our analysis is that 
Noriega will step down as Defense Chief and that a government of 
national reconciliation divided between present regime supporters 
and the opposition will be formed as part of a_n eg <rt lated — 
solution to the crisis. 


The Roots of the Military's Supr eme Position 

The strongman tradition of the Military Commander in Panama 
dates to the 1940s when Police Chief General Jose Remon dominated 
politics and removed presidents at will. The current military- 
dominated political system in Panama was created by General Omar 
Torrijos, who fostered broad grassroots support for the military 
through coopting interest groups across the political spectrum 
and extensive civil action programs. The military s predominance 
in all facets of Panamanian political life has reinforced public 
perceptions that it is the only institution capable of running 
the country and has perpetuated weak civilian institutions. 
Panama's military commanders have demonstrated a willingness to 
use their power to ensure that political developments do not 
threaten the military's preeminent position in Panama; Noriega 
and his predecessor— General Ruben Paredes— removed three 
Panamanian presidents in the last six years and rigged the last 
presidential *>1 actio n to assure tha t the mi li tary_s_pref erred 
candidate won. 


A New Defense Chief^s Power 

Whomever the new Defense Chief is, we believe he will be 
less powerful than Noriega. He probably will need to devote time 
and energy to heal wounds in the officer corps stemming from the 
prolonged crisis. He may also concede some latitude in 
decisionmaking to the national reconciliation government as a 
result of a negotiated settlement. The military, however, is 
likely to strongly resist sacrificing any control of government 
institutio ns for fear of losing financia l benefits and patronage 
positions.! _ 


2 

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Declassified in Part - Sanitized Copy Approved for Release 2012/11/05 : CIA-RDP89G01321R000700340002-7 


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COUNTRY PanaDa 

SUBJECT Political Situation in Panama 


CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 

INFORMATION REPORT 

feovu. 


REPORT NO. 
CD NO. 


DATE DISTR. 
NO. OF PAGES 



8 Jan. •’91^ 



The Remon coalition is reportedly maneuver in" to <*erer President Aleiblades 
25X1 Arosemena's resignation because of bin inability to cope with *he political 

situation. 


Since Vice-President Jose Ramon Guizado rerortedly may refuse the Presidency, 
several cabinet members desiro to form a junta. 

25X1 I commont . Although Remon is displeased with Arosemena's handling of the 

situat ion, a Junta mi-ht result in s"me opposition appointments to the cabi- 
net, thereby wakening Ramon's chances. A strong possibility of Arosemena's 
resignation is indicated in the trend of the pas' three weeks. 








Approved For Release 2006/12/26 : CIA-RDP79-00927A006200060006-4 

W' W 

SECRET , 


including discrimination against 
foreign firms, expropriation of 
some foreign-owned property , 
and emphasis on the nation's 
Hispanic origins . The new con- 
stitution also discriminated 
against West Indian Negro and 
Asian minorities. 

Arias' increasingly dicta- 
torial methods and the furor 
created by his arbitrary con- 
stitution set the stage for a 
coup d'etat late in 1941. Arias 
left Panama secretly on 7 Octo- 
ber for Cuba to visit an eye 
specialist. — [j 

| Because he had failed 
to ask the National Assembly for 
permission to leave as required 
by the constitution. Arias' op- 
ponents seized the opportunity 
to oust him. Unable to arrange 
a flight back to Panama, Arias 
had to book passage by steamship. 
When he arrived in Cristobal less 
than a week after his overthrow, 
Canal Zone police escorted him 
to the Colon city limits where 
he was arrested by Panamanian 
police. After five days of im- 
prisonment he was permitted to 
fly to Nicaragua, where he be- 
gan four years of exile that in- 
cluded stays in Mexico, Cuba, 
Venezuela, Brazil, and finally 
Argentina. 

The Second Presidency 
and PownfalT 

Arias was allowed to return 
to Panama in October 1945, and 
was soon at work forming a new 
party to launch another campaign 
for the presidency. By 1948 he 
was making a strong bid for US 
support for re-election, promot- 


ing the initiation of a new base 
treaty with the US as a major 
campaign issue. An unpopular 
treaty signed by the incumbent 
government had been unanimously 
rejected by the National Assembly 
in December 1947 following mas- 
sive nationalist and Communist- 
inspired protest demonstrations 
before the assembly building. 

Although Arias probably re- 
ceived a plurality of the votes 
in 1948, the government-backed 
candidate was declared the win- 

nerl 

I Arias immediately took 
refuge in the Canal Zone and left 
for Costa Rica, claiming that 
his life was endangered. In the 
fall of 1949, however, an attempt 
by President Daniel Chanis to 
remove the chief of police. Colo- 
nel Jose Remon, prompted Remon 
to stage a coup, recount the 1948 
ballots, and install Arias as 
president. 

Arias had not learned from 
his past mistakes, and his second 
presidency was characterized by 
conspicuous irresponsibility and 
rampant political corruption. 

The president and his cronies 
used public funds freely to en- 
rich themselves, and nepotism 
in government reached new heights 
even for Panama. Arias was one 
of the most culpable and at one 
point his relatives occupied 
four of the principal cabinet 
posts. The few constructive 
accomplishments of Arias ' second 
term — including efforts to 
strengthen relations with the 
US--were offset by Arias' dis- 
regard for constitutional govern- 
ment and a propensity to sidestep 
the law when it stood in the way 


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of ousting enemies or placing 
friends in office. 

The freewheeling president 
quickly alienated members of the 
oligarchy, the legislature, and 
the national police with his 
efforts to stamp out opposition 
to his increasingly high-handed 
methods. Once most of his op- 
ponents were jailed. Arias tried 
to reimpose his authoritarian 
1941 constitution, a move that 
created new and widespread op- 
position. 

The ax fell early in 1951 
when the assembly, reacting to 


Arias ' determination to sus- 
pend it, impeached him and el- 
evated the first vice president 
to office. Although the Supreme 
Court upheld the assembly action. 
Arias had to be physically dis- 
lodged from the presidential 
palace by National Guard chief 
and later president. Colonel 
Jose Remon, who played a major 
behind-the-scenes role in the 
overthrow. After more than 
three hours of bitter fighting 
between armed government forces 
and Arnulfistas , the blood-stained 
Arias was carried off to jail 
shouting "Volveremos" (We shall 
return) . 


1 1 


We Shall Return" 


SECRET 

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ANNEX 



SOternlZl tn P llZ in l h l h i°\ d ^ilian elite fret, 

dominant eouroe of power in Zf the 

America n Trends nfZJt Panama. The Latin 

ment of the political beh™i° PSt f °{ G reoent assess- 

U ’ 1968 - the 

compliant partner of the rJ?f 5 and qenera Hy 

Principally concerned with raaints^^ 113 ^ establishment, 
tional and command inteerritv roi a i? ln ? its organiza- 
litical interference S ?L ^ atlVely free from Po- 
sive to civilian authoSty Sc *? 3 general ly respon- 
se disposed to political J 7 non ~P a rtisan, and 
in moat other Latin American ooSteL^ 3 " “ e n,illt «y 

much the result ^f^^reater Commit tr 3 j' nt ” aS not 30 

alism as it was a reflect!™ °™ ltmen t to constitution- 
al development. For ?he fi?^ ^ ama 3 Unique P°lit- 
pendence, Panama's internal anS^H years of its inde- 
provided by the US under fho^ external security was 
When these missions U, were Sansf^" °* the 1903 ^eaty. 

we re assumed by its small nnf? d ^ Panama in 1936, 
1953 was reorganized as the m-,.*.? 3l ? e force, which in 
military presence In ?he clnaf Zonf 1 GUa3:d - The US 
and the Guard as a result retained remained, however, 
function. r re tamed essentially a police 

political establishment ^hich^ad ent renched 

ence through highly personalised^ since independ- 

dominated Panama's economic life po3ltlca ^ Parties and 

ucurescence in this 


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regimes generally respected the Guard's institutional 
autonomy and tolerated a certain measure of graft. 

When the Guard did intervene, it was not to change the 
system, but to arbitrate disputes within it. On the 
only occasion prior to 1968 when a Guard commander 
ruled the country-— Colonel Jose Remon, from 1951 to 
1955 — he organized a conventional political party 
rather than involve the Guard directly in government. 

The Guard used its influence on behalf of Presi- 
dent Robles in the 1964 election, and in the 1968 con- 
test it attempted to prevent Arnulfo Arias — whom it 
had ousted in 1941 and 1951— from again reaching the 
presidency. Charismatic and demagogic, Arias repre- 
sented, in the Guard's eyes, the one political leader 
with both the will and the ability to challenge the 
Guard's traditional independence and command integrity. 
Ten days after he took office and attempted to punish 
the Guard for its blatant opposition, it ousted him in 
a bloodless coup. 

Although motivated by self-preservation rather 
than ideology, the 1968 coup radically changed the 
Guard's role and opened a new chapter in the history 
of Panama's political development. Having for the 
first time taken direct control of government from 
civilians, and sensitive to the need to rationalize its 
disregard for constitutional procedures, the Guard de- 
cided to picture the new administration as a "revolu- 
tionary" regime committed to creating a modern, pro- 
gressive, and more just society and nation. 

Strongly identifying with the middle class, from 
which most of its officers were drawn, the Guard shifted 
from being the principal supporter of the oligarchy to 
its chief adversary. Under the leadership of Brig. Gen. 
Omar Torrijos, the Guard now was to become "The People 
in Arms." Torrijos consulted with his senior subordi- 
nates on a wide range of policy issues. The General 


June 11, 1975 


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Staff, far more than the emerging new civilian bu- 
reaucracy, was the final arbiter of national programs 
and priorities . An abortive coup within the Guard in 
December 1969, however, convinced Torrijos that he had 
to consolidate his position by securing support outside 
the Guard. Advocating a moderately reformist program, 
Torrijos worked to forge a constituency of students, 
workers, and peasants, and he also reached a modus 
vivendi with the Communists. The election of a legis- 
lature, the adoption of a new constitution, and the in- 
direct election of a new President and Vice President 
in 1972 gave the Torrijos government legal standing. 

The constitution elevated the Guard to a sort of "fourth 
branch" of government, and gave Torrijos for six years 
the dual role of Guard commander and chief of government 

The National Guard and civilian bureaucrats and 
advisers constitute the new elite that runs Panama under 
Torrijos. The civilian component has come increasingly 
to the fore as the government has had to cope with the 
complex problems of running and developing the nation. 

As this has occurred, the direct participation — but not 
the ultimate power — of the Guard in governmental affairs 
at the national level has diminished. The members of 
the General Staff, none of whom is particularly sophisti 
cated, experienced, or professionally qualified to deal 
with complex socio-economic problems, have remained in- 
volved in national decision-making, but increasingly 
have had only a general input into most domestic pro- 
grams. The Guard hierarchy has accepted this civilian 
ascendancy, but does not entirely trust the technocrats' 
motives and methods. Of most concern to some officers 
is the degree of the influence exercised by leftist of- 
ficials and advisers and their own uncertainty over the 
General's long-range plans for social and economic re- 
forms . 

Faced with reconciling its concern for order with 
its desire for change, the Guard has adopted an approach 
designed to encourage progressive reform without severe 


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economic dislocations or unnecessary social antago- 
nisms. While it has accorded considerable emphasis 
to fostering social stability, the Guard has not 
neglected the preventive aspects of maintaining in- 
ternal security. The Guard is still largely organized 
as a police establishment, and the individual Guards- 
man is a respected and feared law enforcement agent. 

Working closely with the community, attuned to its 
moods, and familiar with its personalities, the Guard 
officers have made violent crime less common than in 
many other Latin countries. 

Complementing these police capabilities, and in 
many respects more important in terms of Torri jos 1 
concept of internal security, is the Guard's extensive 
and increasingly professional intelligence apparatus. 
Responsible for all facets of intelligence and national 
security, the Guard's G-2 is directed by the competent 
Lt. Col. Manuel Noriega — probably the second most power- 
ful man in Panama. Operating in an environment in which 
organized domestic political opposition is regarded as a 
threat to the Torrijos system, the G-2 has focused its 
surveillance and penetration efforts on the country's 
politically-conscious movements and organizations. Exiled 
former Guard officers and politicians, students, pro- 
fessional groups, the Communists, and probably members of 
the civilian government bureaucracy are subject to surveil- 
lance, wire-tapping, and on occasion, intimidation and 
reprisals . 

Despite its pre-eminent role under Torrijos, the 
Guard has been reasonably frugal in handling its finances 
and has not indulged in a policy of rapid or inflated pro- 
motions. However, this self-denial has left its members 
exposed to the pinch of inflation and the inherent frus- 
trations of a long- time- in-grade promotion system. To 
solve their economic problems, many senior officers use 
their positions for economic advantage. Although 
Panamanians are long accustomed to corruption, it does 


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tarnish the Guard's revolutionary image and provides 
ammunition for the institution's opponents. 


Even if Torrijos were to leave the scene, there 
is little likelihood of a drastic shift in the role 
of the Guard or major changes in the country's insti- 
tutional structure and political direction. For the 
foreseeable future, the Guard has no intention of re- 
turning to the barracks and surrendering its broad 
political role. The senior officers take seriously 
their role as "The People in Arms," they fully share 
Torrijos 'desire for social and economic improvements, 
and they are convinced that the pre-1968 oligarchy- 
dominated party system or any comparable variation 
cannot be responsive to Panama ' s needs . 


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sbotritx information 

The Security Forces of Panama 

18. The Panama national Police is friendly to the United States 
and probably can and will handle any disorder before it becomes 
dangerous to the Panama Canal. There is no indication of Communist 
infiltration in the national or Secret Police. While the attitude 

of the National Police is anti-Communist, it has not been motivated 
by political considerations in dealing with Communist activities. 

19 . Panama has no armed forces other than the Panama National 
Police and the Panama Secret Police. The present active strength 
of the National Police is 2,453, that of Secret Police 130. The 
National Police is fairly well equipped with small arms but has 
little other equipment. Morale is good and it is unlikely that the 
current political campaign will cause any significant division 
within the National Police. Recent changes in the top command 6f 
the organization have been favorably received by the officers and 
men. The new Commandmant, It. Col. Vallarino, although not as 
capable as his predecessor Remdn, can be expected to maintain the 
usual standard of efficiency of the police. Vallarino is supporting 
Eemdn's presidential candidacy but is not subservient to him. 

Major Saturnino O’. Plores, Second Commandant, who virtually controls 

• the Arms Room, is loyal to Rem<5n. 

Communist Capabilities 

20. Several factors militate against the possibility that 
Communists and pro-Communists could seize control of or dominate 



SECURITY INFORMATION 


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NSC BRIEFING 

I. Extremists are continuing to plan further anti-US violence in 

Panama . 

A. Foreign Minister Moreno told Ambassador Harrington on 4 
December that Panama would issue a press statement within 
the next few days declaring "no progress whatsoever" has been 
made in recent US-Panamanian negotiations. 

B. Student groups are reported to be organizing a meeting for 
12 December to celebrate the anniversary of the Panamanian 
rejection of a US bases agreement in 1947. 

C. Unconfirmed reports indicate that extremists are plotting to 
assassinate Ambassador Harrington, Canal Zone Governor 
Potter, and Panamanian National Guard Commander Vallarino. 


p9Rd0890A001 1 001 20007-5 


8 December 1959 


PANAMA 



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^ OlNIC o4-0j 

11 January 1955 


xi 






‘7 


% 


% 


SPECIAL -Cq, 

NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE ESTIMATE 


J- 




NUMBER 84-55 






CONSEQUENCES OF THE ASSASSINATION 
OF PRESIDENT REMON OF PANAMA 










% 


Submitted by the 




DIRECTOR OF CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE 

r/ie following organizations participated in the preparation 
of this estimate: The Central Intelligence Agency and the 
Intelligence organizations of the Departments of State, the 
Army, the Navy, the Air Force, and The Joint Staff. 

Concurred in by the 

INTELLIGENCE ADVISORX COMMITTEE 

on 11 January 1955. Concurring were the Special Assistant, 
Intelligence, Department of State ; the Assistant Chief of 
Staff, G-2, Department of the Army; the Director of Naval 
Intelligence; the Director of Intelligence, USAF; and the 
Deputy Director for Intelligence, The Joint Staff. The Atomic 
Energy Commission Representative to the IAC and the 
Assistant to the Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
abstained, the subject being outside of their jurisdiction. 

DOCUMENT NO. . 


1 


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If . Comment on ouster of Panamanian president Guizado:: 


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Panamanian president Guizado was 
ousted early on £5 January, He. had been 
implicated in the 2 Janu ary assassina- 


tion of President Remon 

1 



Guizado earlier in the day 


was confined to his residence by the Na- 
tional Guard, which announced that a 


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solution to the murder was near. Also 
arrested were Guizado's son, one of his 
business associates, his minister of 

agriculture and commerce, and many 

followers of former president Arnulfo Arias. 


25X1 


Guizado’s removal because of implica- 
tion in the crime would not necessarily involve a break in the con- 
stitutional order. Ricardo Arias, vice president and foreign min- 
ister, would legally become president. 


Colonel Saturnino Flores, second com- 
mandant of the National Guard, is apparently assuming control of 
the situation and is emerging as the "strong man" of Panama. 


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CURRENT INTELLIGENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY 
3 May 1956 


25X6 


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PANAMA 

The leadership of Panama's 
next administration seems likely 
to be determined less by the 
national elections scheduled 
for 13 May than by the outcome 
of the bitter struggle for pow- 
er within the administration's 
corrupt machine, the National 
Patriotic Coalition Party (PC 
PN). If some degree of unity 
can be restored to the PCPN, 
its compromise presidential 
candidate, Ernesto de la Guar- 
dia, appears assured of an e- 
lection victory over Victor F. 
Goytia, candidate of the only 
legal opposition party, the 
weak and divided National Lib- 
eral Party (PLN) . If PCPN unity 
is not restored, one of its 
two contending factions may 
attempt to seize the government 
by force. 

De la Guardia and outgoing 
president Ricardo Arias appear 
to have lost control of the 
PCPN and seem powerless to stop 
the open feuding within the 
party. The PCPN faction now 
apparently strongest is led by 
Alejandro Remon, the ruthless 
and power-hungry minister of 
government and Justice, who 
would have no stake in a De la 
Guardia administration. Remon 
may have the backing of Lt. 

Col. Saturnine Flores, second 
in command of the National 

Guard, Panama's only armed 

force. 1 J 



Remon Assassination 


The still unsolved assas- 
sination of President Jose A. 
Remon in January 1955 continues 
to be an unsettling factor of 
major importance in Panamanian 
politics. The administration 
has attempted to pin the blame 
on Jose Ramon Guizado, who 
briefly succeeded Remon as pres- 
ident and was then ousted and 
summarily convicted as an ac- 
cessory to the assassination. 
Ruben Miro, the alleged princi- 
pal, still awaits trial and has 
reportedly retracted the con- 
fession which implicated Guizado. 

Public suspicion, and dis- 
satisfaction over the govern- 
ment's handling of the case 
were apparently the cause of the 
rioting in Panama City on 21 
April, and mutual recrimina- 
tions regarding responsibility 


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CURRENT INTELLIGENCE WEEKLY 3J0MMHY 
3 May 1956 


for the murder appear to be 
responsible for the widening 
rift in the PCPN. 


25X1 


Opposition Tactics 

The American embassy sees 
a strong possibility that op- 
position candidate Goytia might 
withdraw from the presidential 
race in a dramatic gesture 
protesting PCPN machine con- 
trol. This, in the embassy's 
opinion, would increase the 
possibility of a coup by a PCPN 
faction. If Goytia withdraws,, 
the PCPN would be unopposed in 
the elections and the adminis- 
tration would be stripped of 
much of its facade of democracy 
and legalistic propriety. 

The desire to maintain this 
facade, mainly for the benefit 


of international opinion, prob- 
ably has restrained PCPN 
factions from blatantly grab- 
bing power in the 15 months 
since Remon’s assassination. 

Among the organized op- 
position political groups at- 
tempting to exploit the present 
instability is the "third 
positionist" Popular Resistance 
Alliance (ARP) , which is in- 
eligible to participate in 
the elections. This group is 
heavily influenced by anti- 
American and pro-Communist 
elements. So far it has con- 
centrated its fire mainly on 
the corruption and self-seek- 
ing of the "oligarchy," which 
it equat es with the PCPN and 
the PLN.7 


The ARP, which reportedly 
is calling for revolution, is 
capable of instigating riot- 
ing and of further arousing 
the already restive public 
against the government. 

I I 25X1 


CUBAN REVOLT 

The revolt in the city 
of Matanzas on 29 April seems 
to have left President Batista's 
grip on Cuba unshaken. Popular 
dissatisfaction with his regime, 
however, is becoming more wide- 
spread, and opposition elements, 
though still apparently inca- 
pable of subverting the armed 
forces , will probably continue 
to exploit the uneasy situation. 

The Matanzas revolt is 
the latest and bloodiest of 
several uprisings against Batis- 
ta's regime since he ousted 
President Prio in the coup of 
March 1952. The revolt of 29 
April was reportedly planned 


by one of Prio's lieutenants, 
Fidel Castro, who led the a- 
bortive attempt against the 
Santiago garrison in July 1953. 
Batista, having suspended con- 
stitutional guarantees for 45 
days to facilitate his crack- 
down on further revolutionary 
activity, had scores of people 
arrested throughout the island, 
including Prio and a number of 
his followers, on charges of 
instigating the uprising. Prio 
himself has since been released. 

The majority of the 
armed forces, still the key to 
power, apparently remains loyal 
to Batista, who has treated the 


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NSC BRIEFING NOTES 


WESTERN DIVISION 
4 January 1955 


ASSASSINATION OF PANAMANIAN PRESIDENT MAY BRING INSTABILITY TO 

PANAMA 


I. Assassination of Panamanian president Remon on 2 January 
may introduce a new period of political instability in 
Panama . 

A. Jose Remon Guizado, first vice president and foreign 
minister sworn in as president on 3 January. He 
will, according to constitution, complete Remon’ s 
term scheduled to end in October 1956. 

B. Guizado 's administration can not be expected to have 
the strength which characterized that of Remon, whose 
position was based on peicsonal following among politi 
cdans, the National Guard, and the public. 

C. The government remains in control of the situation, 
however, and the National Guard, Panama’s only armed 
force, reportedly is supporting Guizado. 

II. Remon 's death may delay formal signing — now scheduled fcr 
12 January — of new agreements between Panama and the 
United States on the Canal Zone. 

A. Guizado, whose attitude toward the United States is 

unclear, stated on 31 December that his sole interest 
is getting the new agreements signed "earliest." 

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III. A, 

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considers 

the assassination a prelude to a Central American 


flare-up. 





Reraon 


had reported to President Perez Jimenez two weeks 
ago that Cuban gunmen were planning to liquidate 
both presidents. 



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1, Guizado an ardent admieer of anti-US 
Arnulfo Arias, ousted former president of 
Panama, in the late forties. He later gave 
strong support to the United States in the 
UN during the Seventh General Assembly, 

2, Guizado was active in the negotiations for 
revision of the canal zone treaty, and visited 
various Central American countries and Mexico 
seeking support for the Panamanian stand, 

3, One report indicated that Guizado has a 
’‘none too savory” reputation in business 
and public office, 

B, Communists, numbering only 50, with perhaps 200 addi- 
tional sympathizers, may in combination with other 
oppositionists attempt to exploit the assassination 
and the treaty issue through disorders, 

III. Still no definite clue as to the identity and motives of 
the assassins. Seems likely that Arnulfo Arias — "... - 
deposed by Remon in 1951 — may have engineered the assassina- 
tion, Possibility that some followers of President Figueres 
of Costa Rica might have been involved cannot be entirely 
discounted, 

A, Some indications that President Remon might have been 
indirectly involved in some Venezeelan-Nicaraguan plan 
to eliminate Costa Rican president Figueres. 



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1. Principal connections between Reraon and Venezuela 

appear to be; 

a. An informal economic agreement which appeared 
to be a straight business transaction, 

b, A Venezuelan military mission which has been 
training the Panamanian National Guard— 
Panamanian military officials in Venezuela 
for training, 

e. Various shipments of arms to the Panamanian 
National Guard early in 1954, 

d. Long standing friendship between President 
Perez Jimenez and Remon. 

e. Only on one occasion did Remon become in- 
volved directly in the continuing Central 25X6A 

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2. Remon apparently disliked and distrusted Figueres, 
and possibly was willing to assist indirectly 
in making trouble for him, 

a. Reports of collaboration between Arnulfo Arias 
and Figueres, however, are not substantiated. 



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b. Panama arrested one Costa Rican revolutionary 
leader on 5 December at the request of the 
Costa Rican Charge, and in July asked the 
brotherof former Costa Rican president 
Picado to leave Panama. 

c. Costa Rican Foreign Minister, however, as 
late as December suspected that Revolutionary 
activities against Costa Rica might start 

or be assisted from Panama. 

3, Remon and Nicaraguan dictator Somoza apparently 

have remained cordial, 25X1X6D 

a. 

25X1X6 

Remon did not trust Somoza, 

4. Available reports do not Indicate the nature of 
the relationships of newly installed President 
Guizado and Presidents Perez Jime.neZy Figueres, 
and Somoza. 




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use BsririHG CONFIDENTIAL 4 J * B ® ar y 1955 

• ■' . v ..’.-i,/ 

ASSASS INAT I OK OF PANAMAKIAN PRK3IM5NT 
I, Still no definite clue to identity end 


motives of assassins who gatitfoff 
Panamanian President ftemon 


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Fens* tie lad '«¥ctir 1 ty chief wati 
istrada cdhildera ' murdeiPi' 3 ^ 


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lode to Central American f lard-tfd.*' ' 1 ' ^ 
On 3 Jen, tie' stated that leatdn had * 
reported to Yenezddlan Itfedident 
Perez two weeks ago that Cuban 
gunmen were planning to liquidate ^ 

beth JJ 

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Some indications Remon indirectly 
involved in some anti-Figueres 
plans of Venezeula and Kicaragua. 
l# Panama has informal economic 
agreement with Venezuili— ^ 
seems straight business 
transaction. 

2, Venezuelan military mission 
has been training Panamanian 
Rational Guard. Panamanian 
officers being trained in 

Venezuela . 

3. Venezuela shipped arms to 
Panamanian Rational Guard 
early in ’54. 

4. Friendship between President 
Perez Jimenez and Remon is 

long-standing . 




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CONFIDENTIAL 


Although Panama ostensibly neutral 

In Plgueres matter — example: 

• 

arrested one Costa Rican revolu- 
tionary leader on 5 Dec *54 at 
request of Costa Rican Charge, 
in July ' 54 asked brother of Costa 
Rican ex-president Picado to 
leave country — Costa Ricans re- 
main suspicious of Panamanian 


assistance to ant i-yigueres groups, 
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CONFIDENTIAL 

E. Remon and anti-Figueres Nicaraguan 
dictator Somoza apparently were 
cordial. 

F. Available reports do not indicate 
nature of relationships between 
new Panamanian President, Guizado, 
and Presidents Perez Jimenez, So- 
moza and Figueres. 

II. Murder may bring period of political 

instability . 

A. Jose Remon Guizado, first vice 
president and foreign minister, 
sworn in as president on 3 Jan. 
According to constitution, will 
complete Remon ’s term(to Oct '5^. 

B. Guizado' s regime will not be as 
strong as Remon' s, whose position 
based on personal following among 
politicians, Nattonal Guard — which 
he once ran — and public. 


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C. Government presently in control 


of situation, however, and 
National Guard — Panama's only 
armed force — reportedly is support- 
ing Guizado. 

III. Remon’s death may delay formal signing- 
now scheduled for 12 Jan — of new Canal 
Zone agreements with US. 

A, Guizado was active in negotiations 
of new treaty, visited various 
Central American countries and 
Mexico seeking support for Pana- 


manian stand. 

Communists (numbering only 50, 
with perhaps 200 additional sym- 
pathizers) might join with anti- 
regime groups in an attempt to 
exploit both assassination and 
treaty issue by means of disordeis. 

CONFIDENTIAL 


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NSC BRIEFING 4 January 1955 


ASSASSINATION OF PANAMANIAN PRESIDENT 
I. Still no definite clue to identity and 
motives of assassins who gunned down 
Panamanian President Remon on 2 Jan 55. 


25X1X6 


I 


Seems likely that former president 
Arnulfo Arias^booted by Remon in 1951- 


may have engineered killing. Also can- 
not entirely discount possibility that 
some followers of Costa Rican Presi— 

f 

dent Figueres were involved. 25X1X6D 



lude to Central American flare-up. 
On 3 Jan, he stated that Remon had 
reported to Venezuelan President 
Perez two weeks ago that Cuban 
gunmen were planning to liquidate 
both presidents. 


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B. Some indications Remon indirectly 
involved in some anti-Figueres 
plans of Venezeula and Nicaragua. 

1. Panama has informal economic 
agreement with Venezuela — but 
seems straight business 
transaction . 

2. Venezuelan military mission 
has been training Panamanian 
National Guard. Panamanian 
officers being trained in 
Venezuela . 

3 . Venezuela shipped arms to 
Panamanian National Guard 
early in '54. 

4. Friendship between President 
Perez Jimenez and Remon is 
long-standing . 


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C. However, reports of collaboration 
I : 

between prime suspect Arnulfo Arias 

and Figueres are not substantiated. 

i . f 

| D. Although Panama ostensibly neutral 

in Figueres matter — example: 

» * ; 

| arrested one Costa Rican revolu- 

| tionary leader on 5 Dec '54 at 

i . ; 

1 request of Costa Rican Charge, 

• l 

! in July ’54 asked brother of Costa 

| Rican ex-president Picado to 

leave country — Costa Ricans re- 
i main suspicious of Panamanian 

i 

assistance to anti-Figueres groups. : 

-3- 

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E. Remon and anti-Figueres Nicaraguan 
; dictator Somoza apparently were 

i 

i cordial. 

i ■ ■■ 

| F. Available reports do not indicate 

| nature of relationships between 

| new Panamanian President, Guizado, 

I and Presidents Perez Jimenez, So- 

1 moza and Figueres . 

! 

II. Murder may bring period of political 

! instability. 

! . 

A. Jose Remon Guizado, first vice 
| president and foreign minister, 

i 

| sworn in as president on 3 Jan. 

| According to constitution, will 

complete Remon's term^to Oct ’5^. 

1 B. Guizado' s regime will not be as 

strong as Remon's, whose position 

| based on personal following among 

3ooo i 

politicians, Natbnal Guard — which 

he once ran: — and public. 

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c. Government presently in control 

of situation, however, and 

j National Guard — Panama's only 

| 

j armed force — reportedly is support- 

I ing Guizado. 

: III. Remon's death may delay formal signing — 

i ' 

i now scheduled for 12 Jan— of new Canal 

; Zone agreements with US. 

1 f 

j A. Guizado was active in negotiations s 

! of new treaty, visited various 

I ; 

j Central American countries and 

i > 

j Mexico seeking support for Pana- 
manian stand. ' 

B. Communists (numbering only 50, 

with perhaps 200 additional sym- 

, pathizers) might join with anti- 
regime groups in an attempt to 

, * exploit both assassination and 

treaty issue by means of disorders. * 




25X1 


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TENSIONS INCREASE 

IN CENTRAL AMERICA: 

The assassination of Panamanian president 
Remon has increased tensions in Central America. 

The chief of the Venezuelan national 
security forces told the American embassy in 
Caracas on 3 January that he considers Remon' s 
killing the prelude to further trouble in 
Central America. He also said that Remon had 
reported to Venezuelan president Perez Jimenez 
two months ago that Cuban gunmen were planning 
to kill both Perez and Remon. . 

The Venezuelan dictator and Nicaraguan 
dictator Somoza may use Remon' s murder to 
"justify" intensified efforts to eliminate Costa 
Rican president Figueres. 

I 25X1 


In Panama itself, Remon's murder will prob- 
ably introduce a new period of instability. 

Jose Ramon Guizado, the new president, will not 
be as strong as Remon was , and Communists and 
other opposition elements may try to exploit the 
situation by stirring up disorder and making 
other difficulties. 

The American embassy in Panama City reported 
on 4 January that the Guizado government will 
sign the new agreement with the United States on 
the Canal Zone "without question." The president 
and his foreign minister admittedly fear that 
"material postponement after 15 January would be 
widely interpreted as a lack of United States 
confidence" in the new government. 


6 Jan 55 CRITICAL SITUATIONS Page 6 


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25X1 



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Remon's assassins and their motives remain 
unknown. 

25X1 


* * * 


6 Jan 55 CRITICAL SITUATIONS Page 7 


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25X1 


25X1 



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w SECRET W 

Western Her! sphere 

PANAMA’S NEW ADMINISTRATION 

President-elect Marco Robles 
seems genuinely anxious to reform 
Panama's corrupt political system, 
to improve its economy, and to have 
amicable relations with the US dur- 
ing his four-year term which starts 
on 1 October. Some long -entrenched 
interests, however, see R obles as 
a threat to the i r power, f 


Robles is not a widely popular 
political figure, but is apparently 
honest and well intentioned. In 
the May elections he managed to gain 
the votes of most of the opponents 
--both right and left — of popular 
demagogue Arnulfo Arias. To win an 
election in which 19 parties com- 
peted for some 300,000 votes, 

Robles made deals with many dis- 
parate elements. Some of them are 
powerful enough to curtail seriously 
his control of his administration 
and hi s freedom of action. 




Robles can count on only a 
bare majority of votes in the new 
National Assembly, which will proba- 
bly be the focal point of pressure 
on the United States for treaty con- 
cessions on the present canal and 
any studies for a sea-level canal. 
Irresponsible criticism of the United 


Robles’ anti-Communist record 
as minister of government and jus- 
tice from 1960-63 offers great im- 
provement over President Roberto 
Chiari's evident weakness for ex- 
treme leftist counsel. Many intel- 
ligent, capable, and well-trained 
ultra nationalist leftists, how- 
ever, still have key positions in 
government and news media. Robles 
will be hard put to identify and 
oust those who may indeed be re- 
sponsive to Communist or Cuban di- 
rection. There is also in Panama, 
as in other Caribbean countries, 
increasing evidence that Castro is 
encouraging early action by groups 
who favor hard-line tactics of vio- 
lence and subversion. Castro-con- 
tact Thelma King has recently re- 
turned from a visit to Peiping, the 
latest of a number of Panamanians 25X1 
to return this year from Cuba and 

the bloc, some after extens i ve 

training courses.! I 


States is favorite political tender 
in Panama , particularly this year 
when resentment over last January's 
riots has been nurtured by the 
Chiari government and sensationalist 
news media . Two Assembly members 
are pro-Communists and represent 
banana workers’ unions at odds with 
the United Fruit company in prov- 25X1 
inces where there is subversive ac-25X1 
tivity . 


2 Oct 64 


SECRET 

CURRENT INTELLIGENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY 


Page 15 


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25X1A 


8. DEFENDANT'S ACQUITTAL IN PANAMANIAN ASSASSI- 
NATION TRIAL MAY SPARK DISORDERS 


25X1 A 



The atmosphere in Panama is tense and 
conducive to disorders as the result of 
the acquittal on 6 December of Ruben 
Miro, accused assassin of former Pres- 
ident Jose Remon, Alejandro Remon, 
politically powerful brother of the slain 
president, is strongly opposed to the ac- 25X1 

auittall 

: 

? * Y1 


American embassy believes, however, that 
the national guard will continue to maintain 
control. 


The politically charged trial, which 
opened on 21 October, had been delayed almost three years 
by the maneuvering of powerful politicians, who apparently 
were attempting to prevent the revelation of possible incrim- 
inating facts related to the assassination. 

The verdict will require a review of the 
impeachment and prison sentence of former President Guizado, 
Remon's successor. Guizado was convicted as an accomplice 
in the murder solely on the basis of Miro's confession, which 
was later retracted. 


8 Dec 57 Current Intelligence Bulletin Page 10 


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I 


t-. 


L.l~i •• 


T HR ill-fated ouster of Pan- 
ama’s Prig. Gen. Omar Tor- , 
rijos should warn us to stop 
allowing ourselves to he talked 
out of the secure U. S. zone 
protecting the Panama Canal 
7 — Senate Foreign Relations; 

•e""'-. Committee Chairman J. Wil- 
j liani Fulbright notwithstand- 
I ing/ 

i Our taxpayers have invested 


1 

II 

to 


their arms into Panama. Their embarkation - 
point is La Colrtva, Cuba — Soviet-occupied. 


VUI ■ — 

55 billion in the Canal Zone. 

. And as a spokesman for changing the zone’s 
! status to Panamanian, Sen. Fulbright is, 

1 again, and as usual, niuddlehcadcd. 

‘ Such worried men as Chief of Naval Opera- 
tions Admiral Thomas H. Moorer could tell 
you about the canal's global strategic impor- 
tance. And as for Latin America, RO per cent of 
Peru’s and Chile’s imports and exports pass_ 
thru it. The dependency Is equivalent along 
the entire Pacific side of the continent. 

• • • 

The Republic of Panama Is threatened by 
communist guerillas internally and on either 
side of its two frontiers. How can anyone ig- 
nore the fact that Panama (population 1.4 mil- 
lion borders on chaotic Costa Rica and Col- 
ombia? Is it news that Imported Red guerillas 
are staging a horrible shooting war in nearby 
El Salvador? Are we blind to the Rcd-lnstigat- 
cd eruptions in neighboring Guatemala and 
Honduras? ■ 

I dined with Nicaraguan President Anastnsio 
Somoza Jr., who spelled out for me the Red 
attacks closing in on Panama. Except Nicara- 
gua, our 10 -mile-wide Canal Zone is the only 
zone of stability in the entire region. 

: Demagogs abound in Panama’s faction-rid- 

'^den political jungle. Their most popular sport 
! is to kick Uncle Sam at every opportunity. 

' .Worried Admiral Moorer finds that Fidel Cas- 
' tro’s gueriUa fleet .Is. moving fighters jind 


The CIA, in turn, finds that air deliveries 
are from the Soviet air base at hcavily-guard- \ 
cd San Julian, 90 miles southeast of Havana. - 
The CIA also finds all deliveries growing 
steadily and that they are paid for by Soviet 
gold. The .propaganda support comes — and at 
a new high pitch — - from Castro’s powerful ■ 
Russian-built radio station on Cuba’s key 
Breton peninsula. 

Havana-based Costa Rican Julio Sunol is one > 
of Latin America’s most famous communists. 
Bloody-fisted Sunol often presides in Moscow 
at the annual "conference of the peoples," the. 
party's assembly of guerilla revolutionary 
cadres. Castro has now reinstalled Sunol in 
Costa Rica, on Panama’s border, as the oper-. 
ation’s director. 

Castro’s resident agent in charge in Pana- 
ma, communist Thelma King, won her spurs 
in 1904 when four U. S. soldiers were killed in 
■the riot in our Canal Zone. In fact, Thelma. 
King herself led the rioters into the Canal Zone'., 
and has been boasting about killing these U. S. ’ 

’ soldiers ever since in Panama City. 

The real question we face is not the surren- 
der in U. S. control of the canal versus Pana- 
manian control. The real question Is U.S. 
control versus Communist control. 

.It should" be debated la. tiie" Senate on that! 


: basis. 




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■# Eerrr r > 


( 


February 1977 


MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD 
SUBJECT: ZRKNICK Operation 

CIA HISTORICAL REVIEW PROGRAM 

"X. release as sanitized 

^ "^X.1998 


(Non CS Material) 
Job # 

File # 
Volumes : 
Dates : 


75-752 (Box #4) 
200-5-38 
6 

1961 - Feb 65 


1 . Description : 

Investigation of Cuban espionage net in Miami, Fla., 
by FBI who shared take with CIA. CIA corresponded with 
field stations re same. Was international in scope. 

2. Findings: (See attached) 

Roberto-Themla King folders. Panama connection. 
Thelma King was a Panamanian left-wing politician, pro-Castro 
Deputy to the National Assembly. Was personal field of Fidel 
CASTRO. She was recruited by Fidel in August 1962 to perform 
espionage mission in Panama. Trained in SW, commo, etc. She 
was reportedly head of the Cuban-directed commo network in 
Panama . 

HZPA 13,960 dated 3 Dec 63 : 

Dispatch from Panama City to Hqs . re 22 Nov 63 
Jake Esterline£ ^meeting and her comments re Kennedy and 
Castro . 


LAD/JFK Task Force 


Researcher: JZ 



( 




February 1977 

MEMORANDUM FOR THE RECORD 

SUBJECT: ZRKNICK Operation (Non CS Material) 

Job # 75-752 (Box ? 

unnumbered 

File # 200-5-38 

Volumes : 

1 . Description: 

FBI investigation of Cuban espionage net in Miami, 

Fla/, was international in scope; take shared with CIA. 

2. Findings : (see attached) 

a. PACY 1073 (IN 48464) 26 Oct 63: Vol. Ill 
Cable from Panama City to Hqs. Jake Esterline 

and Station Cl group dissatisfied with unresolved aspects 

of frl SAGE £ 4 1 ops . 

b. MEXI 6969 (IN 64256) 19 Nov 63 ; Vol. Ill 
From Mexico City to Hqs. re involvement of 

Francisco "Paco" AMADO with Guatemala guerrillas. 

c. DIRECTOR 84449 dated 21 Nov 63 ; Vol. Ill 

From Hqs. to WAVE, re sensitive information that 
Cuban Intelligence was targetting against person employed in 
State Dept office in Miami. 

d. DIRECTOR 84791 22 Nov 63 : Vol. Ill 

From Hqs. to Panama City. Re f act £zJsAGE-2 much* 
affected by death of President. 



e. DIRECTOR 86343, 27 Nov 63 : V ol. Ill 

From Hqs. to WAVE and Panama City. Hqs. 

suspects Blanca Alicia FRANCO may be spearhead of penetration 
AMDT/CIA ops on behald of ZRKNICK complex. 

f. HDCA 3405, 29 Nov 63; Vol. Ill 

Dispatch from Santo Domingo to Hqs., 

concerning one Eduardo TAVARES Justo. 

g. HMMA 22632, 18 Dec 63; vol. Ill 
Dispatch from Mexico City to Hqs. re 

Francisco AMADO and visits from emissaries of Fidel CASTRO. 
Reported to have CASTRO's confidence and perform services for 
the Communists. 

h. DIRECTOR 90507, 20 Dec 63 ; Vol. Ill 
From Hqs. to Panama City and Bern. Someone 

may have used ^JsAGE-T’s ticket. 

i. DBA 57414, 21 Nov 63; Vol. IV 

Re Manolo GARCIA who had driver's license 
in name of Manolo RODRIGUEZ who may be iden^with Cuban DSE 
officer in 64 allegedly responsible for recruiting Emilio 
ECHARTE Pedroso to enter U.S. to assassinate Cuban exile, 

Manolo RAY. 

j. UFGW-3350, 25 Feb 64 ; yol. V 

From Hqs. to JMWAVE. re list of names and 
addresses on Cuban Intelligence Service Censorshio Lists. 

k. PACY 4074 (IN 30576) 17 July 64; Vol. VII 
From Panama City to Hqs. Station will try hard 

to get additional answers and clarification frora£*^3A8E-l. 



1 • BO GO 4761 (IN 41774) 3 Aug 64; 


Vol . VII 


From Bogota to Hqs . re pro-Castro group in 
the Civil Aeronautics Admin. 

m. C.^j 3l7 2 1, 1 5 Oct 64 : Vol. vill 

To D from Hqs. When Pres. Kennedy 

DGI officer directed officers in National Liberation Bldg. , 
to prepare radio commo for transmission by Radio Havana. 


Researcher: CDH 

MB 


LAD/ JFK Task Force 



r J tfw». »-»-»*) 


united st A rcs department op justice 

IXMHAL OURZAU Of INVEOTJOATIOM 


Uuf / 

WF- y) zsry 


IHS, District Office, WDC; US Customs, WDC; IBS, Mlenl; 

US Customs, Miami; OSI, KACDILL, APB; G-2, Port KePhereon, 
Georgia; ONI, Sixth Haval District, DIO, Charleston, S, C. 
HERBERT J. MORGAN, JR. OCfc*. Washington, D. C. 

lA DEC 2 1 K59 

hm ohw* rn» u 97-1159 >««• ro« ti 105-75663 


Cera 


Dm 


TK« 


RUEER OSC 


AR^MIRO OUARDIA £ 



INTERNAL SECURITY - PAH AM A ; REGISTRATION ACT - PANAMA; . ¥ijj\ 
NEUTRALITY MATTERS £ ^ 

* i& 

Subject me t I. TRYING ^ DAVIDS CR at DAYIDSOMs office 12/6/59. 

Desired ssaiaVanco of T)AVIDSGlf~f or Invasion of^fjinomej_in 
January, I960. Again met at sane place with DAVIDS Cm and 
LE0P0LD0 ARAGON, 12/9/59 and 12/11/59. Dlacuaaed above 
invasion plana. MIRO told DAVIDSON ho had support of US 
Government for invasion. DAVIDS CM told KISO 12/11/59, he 
had checked with • US Government agency and could not 
verify any backing for MIRO. DAVIDSCil told MIRO he would 

give no asaistance. MIRO told DAVIDSOH that£ O t* _ - ' 

CIA representative, Panama, could verify support of US for 
KIRO. Subject interviewed 12/17/59. At first denied above 
and later stated he did not desire to dlscuas the matter. 


- P - 


DETAILS: AT WASHINGTON. D. C. 


c 


Z4 


n 


t 


23 DtvE-3 


.S 5 G RBT - 

TV 4. ' tw«tt. ..iiVm IHMU.VIIIU m cMcW.Tu.'.rua'Tal. n U «V« ,■■,»« ? •» tv. r»I at t. Imm 4 h 

H« III miMV niMtot. iiitMM mviii rw 




WFO 97-U59 

. iq<q Mr. VOPE advised SA COLE 

On Hovember 17, 1J59. K hl9 s tay in the 

that KIRO had made epp ^°“° revealed that KIRO was 
United States. The applies ° bv occupation end 

born October 29, : 1911. was an «t< o r-vl.ltlnr 
was in the United States for the purpo^ ^ of hls 

a is t e r*Kr !»r* P AO W ADE » ^a^Urlve. _S. 

panama, S and° was* identified as JUSKIBUlW- 

, . 4.* uT^o Indicated ho would 

On the application, MTRO i 19 ^ Q> vhlle In 

depart the United States on ■ frets * yearly 

«” On 1 Md . J^ ‘ 5 from oin.r.fclp of 

«»0 lo41c.t.J hi. J.W1T .xp.»«t»P.. 

as $3 1 OOO . 

*»_ vopS advised SA COLS that sub .tact's vise 
R r » yOrt. . pp ioCo to be valid until 

had been extended on October 22, 1 b t 

inrll 10. I960. 






(«•». ii-M-in 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INYESTI6 .OK 
INTERVIEW REPORT 


12/11/59 


D«rt* 


I 


1. IRVING DAVIDSON', Suite 306, 1612 K Street, 

. K.W. , Washington, D. C, , advised on or about Docenber 7, 

1959, he received a telephone call from a friend whom 
be declined to identify alio is connected with a labor 
union In Washington, D. C.. which he declined to Identify, 
Indicating that an Individual by the name of REDES MIRO 
bad contacted the unidentified Individual and union 
for assistance regarding an invasion of Panama. This 
person told DAVIDSON that the union did not desire to_ 

, become Involved in any natter similar to this and In 
order to "get MIRO off their backs" this person desired 
to send UIRO to see DAVIDSON. • DAVIDSON felt that the 
reason UIRO was sent to see him was duo to the fact that 
DAVIDSON in the past has sold arms and this fact has 
been publicized in various newspapers. 

On December 8, 1959, DAVIDSON received a 
telephone call from an individual Identifying hlaself as 
RUBEN MIRO. MIRO expressed a desire to see DAVIDSON and 
did visit DAVIDSON at his office on December 8,'^\959.-5DAYIDSOK 
exhibited a register maintained in his office whicn 
contained the signature RUBES MIRO, 2901 Park Drive, S.E., 
and dated December 8, 1959. 

At the outset MIRO advised DAVIDSON that he was 
aware that DAVIDSON was registered as an agent of the 
Hlcaraguan Government. He explained that he, MIRO, bad 
previously been jailed fer three years In Panama as the 
alleged assassin of a former Panamanian President. MIRO 
further stated that he had Joined a CASTRO group in Cuba 
in order to Invade Panama. MIRO claimed that be had 
notified United States officials of this Invasion and 
had received assurance from the unnamed United States 
officials that no action would be taken by the American 
Government to discourage bis plans. At that time, MIRO 
had explained to the United States Government officials 
that he would cleanse the Panamanian Government of 
anti-American factions and because of this, be had 
received their blessings. UIRO told DAVIDSON that in 


Ut«ryl«w with h DAVIDSON L_ Fll. f WTO 97-1159 

•• 12/10/59 Washington, D. C. r>^. Aw,^U 13/11/59 

hy Tpiclit DONALD HOETISO ar.d HERBERT J, M ORGAN. JR. :ahw 

fwwrtr rtl - tkU Hfrt tttumu mn f W rfblrfhtfW nuOi (I* 

, -V 



rro 97-1159 


order to formulate plans for this Invasion, he had 
, traveled to Cuba and conferred with Cuban Preaier FID EL 
A CASTRO, his brofher, RAUL'vC ASTRO, Head of the Arsed 
T'ofces, and Commandant s ER N ES TO""" C HE". ^GUEVARA. U IRO 
explained that be' was "sucked in" by communist ideology 
and became disillusioned because the Cubans desired 
to conduct*. the invasion of Panama in their own way. 

As a result, he was summoned to the office of RAUL 
CASTRO and made to stay in that vicinity until the 
invaders had departed Cuba. DAVIDSON recalled that this 
bad taken place in April of 1959. * 


Upon being released, UIRO stated that he had 
fled to Miami, Florida, whereupon he had immediately 
called Panama and notified unidentified persons of the 
imminent invasion. UIRO claimed that he had Instructed 
that the Invaders be captured but not killed since 
they had been deceived by the Cubans. 

UIRO told DAVIDSON that he planned .to «• 
Invade Panama in January, 1960. He desired that DAVID30N 
assist him in obtaining $50,000 and enough equipment and 
armament to outfit 250 men for the invasion. DAVIDSON 
advised that he had a list of this equipment but could 
not locate it at that particular moment, but when it was 
located, would furnish the list to the FBI. DAVIDSON 
recalled that the list did include feur PBY's, 250 .30 
caliber machine guns, 300 Carand rifles, 3,000 "IT* rations, 
which UIRO indicated would be enough for ten days, 250 
knapsacks, 250 canteens, 250 bayonets, "an unrecalled 
quantity of 60 millimeter mortars, an unrecalled number 
of 100 pound Napalm bombs, and one LST. 

DAVIDSON recalled that even though MIR0 desired 
enough rations for ten days, he had stated that the 
invasion would end in a successful revolution in Panama 
within 72 hours. 

UIRO desired that DAVIDSON attempt to acquire 
the above material and equipment through the Nicaraguan 
Government. He subsequently told DAVIDSON that be, UIRO, 
had the complete backing of the United States Government 



WFO 97-1159 

concerning the invasions He would not identify nnjr 
Individuals by name, but indicated that his green light 
had been obtained through Unit** States officials in the 
Panama Canal Zone. At this point DAVIDSON told MIRO he 
was goin-r to check on his story to ascertain if, in fact, 
he did have any b»cking from United States Government 
officials. He subsequently told UIRO that he would- 
contact the FBI, the State Department, and the Central 
Intelligence Agency (CIA). There were no specific 
objections raised by MIRO and h* told DAVIDSON that he 
would have to contact high officials to verify his story. 


MIRO told DAVIDSON that if his assistance 
would be given, DAVIDSON would be granted cutting rights 
on 100,000 acres of timber land in Panama subsequent to 
the success of the revolution. 

DAVIDSON stated that on December 9, 1959, 

MIRO reappeared at his office and reiterated the above 
information. 


•jjr Shortly thereafter, he was joined by LEOP OLDO 

< yA R AGON, who was introduced by MIRO as a friend. ARAGON 
explained his presence by merely saying that .he was there to 
Insure that UIRO was contacting persons of substance in 
fcls efforts to effect an invasion of Panama. ARAGON 
affirmed to DAVIDSON that MIRO had the backing of the 
United States Government regarding his plans. From 
conversation with ARAGON, it was ascertained by DAVIDSON 
that ARAGON had previously been associated with labor 
organizations in Panama and DAVIDSON fell chat ARAGON 
had possibly been instrumental . in introducing MIRO to the 
previously mentioned labor group in Washington, D. C. 

While in DAVIDSON'S,, presence, ARAGON and MIRO 
became engaged in an argument and it was obvious tr * 

DAVIDSON that there seemed to be friction between She two. 
AKAGON gave tee impression on December 9, I95y, through 
conversation with BIRO in DAVIDSON?s presence, that he 
felt that MIRO was too hasty and erratic in his actions. 


i 



VFO 97-1159 


DAVIDSON' advised that another meeting was 
scheduled for the above three perscns In his office 
for 4:30 PM, December 11, 1959. At this time, DAVIDSON 
is to advise MIRO and ARAGON whether he sill be of 
any assistance. DAVIDSON Indicated that he Is not at 
all interested in becoming involved in the above 
endeavors. 


DAVIDSON’ stated that In his opinion ARAGON is 
a very intelligent ind.vidual, however, he considers 
MIRO highly cmc t Iona’, acd pc-sstnly somewhat unstable. 

By explanation, he related that when on December 9, 19S9, 
the subject of United Stttes becking for MIRO was again 
breached, MIRO became trc*r.*ed and indicated a desire to 
immediately call his contact, in the United States 
Government , Panama Canil i-me, 2 nd have' DAVIDSON talk 
with inis person. Me furl.u" stvtt-J that MIRO, when 
discuss tag high United States officials, stated tin* he 
has an entree with AiL£S DULIXS, Director, CIA, ti *oigh 
DULLES's maid, whose name was -fore! ‘-‘bed by MIRO ar 
NATALIE. MIRO went >n ti say thet- hia nursemaid »..* a 
child is a close friend of NATALIE, • both of whom are In 
Washington, D. C. He indicated DAVIDSON that any time 
he desired to see Ur. DCLLES, be o’o-ild make arrangements 
through NATALIE. M~.R0 hi* further indicated to DAVIDSON 
that he still detirad to call the aforementioned 
United States Gcvernmstt official in the Panama Canal 
Zone when he visits DAVIDSON on December 11, 1959. 

DAVIDSON stated that MIRO repeatedly intimated that he 
felt that DAVIDSON truld obtaic the necessary equipment 
from Nicaraguan President LOIS SOMOZA. DAVIDSON stated 
that there was no indication teat MIRO had tried to obtain 
this equipment from Nicaragua b/ direct contact. 

The only other person mentioned by UIBO as being 
Implicated in the above invasirc plans was described by 
MIRO as a top police eff ic tal in Pacama whose name was 
furnished to DAVIDSON eel; as «TU ARINA (phonetic) v 


6 


4 



I 




i WTO 97-1159 ' 

i 1TIR0 told DAVIDSON that be planned to depart 

for the Invasion from. Mexico wnd~ that "D Day" bad to be 
i In January, I960, so that U1RO would have enough tine 

! to ntablixo the Government and still keep the Rational 

! elections scheduled for May, I960. He felt by doing 

this, he would show the people of Panama that his 
revolution was for the good of ill. The Invasion 
force would consist of 30 Panamanians who would leave 
Cuba and Join MIRO In Mexico. These persons would bo 
Joined by other Panamanians, number unknown, at which time they 
would beard the LST and depart. 

j In conclusion, DAVIDSON stated that at approxl- 

1 aately 2:G0 PM, December JO, 1959, he received a telephone 

i call from ARAGON, who stated that he, ARAGON, would 

have nothing further to do with MIRO and his plans, 
i since he docs not like MIKO’s actions and attitude. ARAGON 

1 told DAVIDSON, however, that he wceld appear at DAVIDSON’S 

i on December 11, 1959, since he dees not uesirc that MlilO 

| become Immediately aware that he, ARAGON, Is not planning 

j to further develop Invasion plans ccnccri-lne Panama. 





1 



i *y»*t ow.. ''“'OERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGA. S' 

| . . INTERVIEW REPORT 

Do.. I 2 /* 1/59 


La/ /■*’- T" / advised 

that he had obtained the following Information concerning the 
•i.recent activity of RUBEN OSCAR U1R0 GUARDIA and LEOPO LDO 
jfcARAGON ESCALOXA, both of whom are Panamanian nationals 
residing in Washington, D. C. 

BIRO has recently been in contact with a person In 
Washington, D. C. , whose identity is not known to the informant 
and who is interested in getting into the lumber business in 
.Panama. This person has advised MIRO that ho is attempting 
to obtain financial backing for this venture from persons in 
New Vork City, and. about two and one-half weeks ago advised 
MIRO th at WILLIAM N HO FFA. brother of Teamsters Union President 
"JI11UY" HOFFA, as well as a Br . GIBBONS <flrst name unknown) 
who is located at the headquarters of thel -Teamsters Union 
in Washington. D. C. ~. might be Interested in backing him in 
this veuture. 

Possibly as a result of this mention of the 
Teamsters Union, MIRO, about two weeks ago, asked ARAGON 
to call GIBBONS at the Teamsters Union and make an appointment 
for them to see GIBBONS. ARAGON did cake this appointment 
and on Thursday, November 26. 1939, ARAGON and MIRO went to 
the Teamsters Union hfcadqu->r T ors la Washington, D. C.. to 
fulfill this appointment. Or their arrival there they'Verc 
told that GXJIB0N3 was net available but a Mr. STEIKBKRG* (first 
name unknown) .who was Ider.tiflJd to them as "JIMMY" HOFFA' s 
personal assistant or secretary, was expecting them. 

At this meeting MIRO furnished STEINBERG with 
Information concerning UlRO's background as regards Panamanian 
revolutionary activities and his recent difficulties in 
attempting to arrange for an invasion of Panama from Cuba. 
According to the informant, MIRO, after laying; this grounds 
work, told STEINBERG that if .the Teamsters Union would back 
him In an invasion cf Nicaragua , that Union could have a 
free hand In organizing laber both It Panam a^ a nd in the 
Panama Canal Zone. MIRO also mentioned to SfTElNBERG that 
gambling activity in Parana will undoubtedly increase In the 
future but he made no comnith-ertts concerning the granting 


Ini.rvi.w „i,h VJFT-J Fit. # WFO 97-1159 

„ 12/10/59 ., Washington, D. C. Dot . 12/11/59 


tp.rini A g ..s RICHARD B . KELLOGG and ANDREW J. SHANNON RBK: red 


TVla 4«^w»aa* coataiM Mliaat (acaxMawitltM aw cctc|.«l:ta el i\a FBI. If t« the p#er«rty el the FB! tM U leeaal te 
l**l eyeery: It aa4 lie coetenfe eee eel te he euutlwlH eaten* yaw* ayengy. 


1 


( 



t 

j 


' \ t 

1 

\ 

WO 97-H59 

i 

of enabling concoseioas to tho Teamster s U nion if they 

backed his venture. UIRO indicated to STEINBERG he would 

desire that the Union put up $50 000 and in addition, either 

furnish the arns and equipment which UIRO would require or 

put up anothor $400,000. , 

According to the informant, STEINBERG gave no 
indication that he had previous knowledge of what it was 
UIRO desired to discuss with him and did not act particularly 
surprised at tho above proposition. STEINBERG nade no 
comm.* * (tents but only stated that he would have to talk to 
"HOFFA" about the matter and UIRO would be contacted. UIRO 
gave STEINBERG the address and telephone number where he i 

could be contacted. The informant said that to the best 
of his knowledge there was r,o mention made at this confer- 
ence concerning a lumber venture in Panama. 

The informant stated that on December 7, 1959, 

ARAGON tclephonlcally contacted STEINHERG and was advised 

that UIRO would be contacted in the rear future by his 

friend. According to the informant, UIRO, later that day, 

advised ARAGON that he had been contacted by STEINBERG’S 

friend who had not identified himself but who had listened 

to UIRO's story and then stated he would have to check on 

UIRO and would contact him at a later date. The informant 

said UIRO had advised STEINBERG'S friend, in addition to 

what he had told STEINBERG, that the United States Govern- . ’ , 

ment would "look the other way” coacersing UIRO's proposed 

invasion of Panama. On December 9, 1959, ARAGON went to tho 

Teamsters Union headquarters in Washington, D. C. , and 1 

left « note for STEINBERG iedioatiog thit it was urgent 

that he, ARAGON, meet with she man who had contacted UIRO. 

Later that day, according ro the informant, ARAGON was 
contacted by a man who Siid his name **?« DAVIDSON, who 

Indicated he was calling with reference to the above note., j | 

and requested that ARAGON m-ist him **. bis, DAVIDSON'S, { 

office at 1G12 K Street, N.lf. , Washington, D. C. According 1 

to the informant, ARAGON then islephonicaily contacted UIRO, r ■■ 

advised him that he had aa ipjcmueit to see DAVIDSON, 
and requested that UIRO corns ir- r»s 3P3rtment to babysit. 

The informant .said UIRO did gc re ARAGON' s apartment for this 

purpose and ARAGON met with DAVIDSON u DAVIDSON’S office at 

approximately 3:30 p.m. on tetecler 9, 1959. At the time of • 

this meet leg DAVIDSON told ARAGON That UIRO had been to his 

office earlier th3t day >ud told him to have nothing to dp 

with ARAGON sj are this cutiro natiei was being handled by ; 

UIRO. The informant stated it Is his understanding that 

ARAGON questioned this and ejiled UIRO from DAVIDSON'S office 

at which time UIRO advised ARAGON that D.cVIDSON was not 






WFO 97-1159 

tolling the truth. When ARAGON so informed DAVIDSON, 

DAVIDSON got on an extension of the same telcphono being 
utilized by ARAGON and when he confronted JilRO with the facts, 
MXRO said ARAGON was acting on his own. 

Very shortly after the above telephone conversation, 
UIRO arrived at DAVIDSON'S office and in tho presence of 
.DAVIDSON and ARAGON acted, according to the Informant, 
in a highly emotional, excited and irrational manner. He 
shouted that he could take DAVIDSON to people at the 
Department of State who would tell him the Department of . 
State would look favorably on a proposed invasion and 
UIRO soveral times picked up the telephcue in DAVIDSON'S 
office stating be was going to call Pui-ams or FIDKi. CASTRO 
In Cuba and they would gi-e DAVIDSON ihe true facts. Tho 
informant said this meeting was ct-rcludcd when DAVIDSON 
stated that he would check on UIRO in his own way. Tie y 
agreed to meet again on December 11, 1969, at DAVIDSON's 
office ar which time DAVtDSON would give them his answer 
concerning assistance fer .IINO in i-.s proposed invasion. 

The informant noted that at rhe time of this 
moctlng DAVIDSON had in his possession the note which had 
been left at the Teamsters Unic*: ay ARAGON. The informant 
also uoted that DAVIDSON had stated that he believed UIRO 
to be "crazy". 

According tc tho icformec*. H1R0 and ARAGON 
intended to meet with DAVIDSON at DAVIDSON's office at 
4:30 p.m., December 11, 1959. 

The informant also stated ti>it ARAGON has expressed 
a fear of "crossing" UIRO in tnis m-tr-r as ho too feels 
UIRO is a "mental case* and might vf.ry well do bodily barm 
to ARAGON. 

The leformart advised »n.r oc December <1, 1959, 

UIRO, utilizing a typewriter ewe*:; by ii lAwON, typed a 
memoiaodun concerning the equiO’p*.- r»t watch would be required 
for his proposed invasion along with the conditions 
surrounding the obtaining of that material end the privileges 
that would be given to the person furnishing that natci.al. 

The informant made available a copy of that Memorandum 
which is as follows: 

•‘Nome i /.idun. 

"Conditions: 


"1 ■ -l*r_ X name will not be we.i-» ior-cd under any circumstances; 

* l0 




t 




VTO 97-1159 , 

«2 .-Ur X nay clearly Indicate privilege and grants he desires 

Sts *- 

72 hours. No exccssoss intended. . n ^ 

"5. -Inmed lately after end of operation equipment shall be 

«6. -oTfers** to Mr_X to be fulfilled within 30 days after 
taking control of office. 


: I 
; » 


♦'Equi poeot required : 

M SLuS’flUre bon. equipped -ith 20 

30 cal. ra chine guns, rocket launchers and bomb racks. 

"fOO light - bombs. 

••200 Rockets. 

"500.000 30 cal. shots. 

"60.000 gallons of airoplane gasoline. 

”1 Tv set. 

"1 radio sot. 

"1 radio trensml ssor and receptor. 

"3. COO X rations. 

"Food and medical supplies. 

"100 Garand Rifles. 

"100 B r owning authonatic riflss. 

"250 MX c arabines." (30-30) . 

"250 kni#es. 

" 50 thompsons. 

" 6 mortars t60 mm. cal.) . 

"30 Kachiao guns t.30 cal., air coolingJ. 

"20 Field glasses. 

"10 conpasses. 

"20 walkie-talkies. 

"500 Cac t ines . „ 

"500 Belts^ 

"250 pistol holders. . - «... 

"500 pairs of boots, assorteu sixes (mainly 7, 8 and s>. 

"1.000 pairs hese. 

"300 mortar shells cal. 60 mm. 

"150.000 43 cal. shots. 

"SOOTcOO Garand and Browning snots. 

"lOOTCOO 30-30 cal. shots. 

«150 — thompsocs magazines. 

"300 Brown ing - l»agaxtnos. _ , 

"500 Ml magazines (large ones.) 

"400 pounds dynamite and accessories^ 


t : 


* 

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i 


! I 

i -J 

f 

i 



j Tho Infornaat advised that it is his understanding 

i that tho "Ur. X“ mout loned in the above memorandum is no 

spocific individual but is anyone who will financo UlRO's 
invasion plans or furnish tho above oquipaent for that 
purpose. 




•w ryuri 1 )* ntr 



s' 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIC IOH 
INTERVIEW REPORT 

Do,. , 12/15/ 59 


t 


On December 11, 1959, I. IRVING DAVIDSON 
telephonically advised that RUBEN MIRO and LEOPOLDO ARAGON 
j were present at his, DAVIDSON'S, offlco when he arrived at 

[ 4:45 p.m. Upon his arrival DAVIDSON stated that ARAGON 

j advised that he, ARAGON, and MIRO did not see "eye to oye 

J on things.” ARAGON said that although he is sympathetic 

with UIRO's cause, that is, ♦he planned invasion to overthrow 
the Panamanian Government , be loos not believe that the ~ 

• United States Government is gumg to do whatever MIRO 
! wishes. 

i DAVIDSON said he told MIRO and ARAGON that he 

I checked with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FDD and 

| the United States Department of State and both tho FBI 

| and the State Department are unaware as to the "groon light” 

1 for the Panama Invasion. DAVIDSON stated at. this point 
| that he told UIHO he was quite angry because MIRO was only 

! talking about the "green light" backing by the United States. 

DAVIDSON advised that NIRO then wanted a long distance 
telephone call to be placed to onef^* telephone 

number .3 Panama City, Panama. MIRO said that £ Ota 

is an Agent for the CentraL Intelligence Agency and that 
MIRO's code name i s CARLOSXVASQUE7 w hen dealing with 

I etsiiASL /)< <££ 

Although the telephone calDwas placed it was 
without success. The call was then postponed until Monday, 
December 14,1959, and DAVIDSON stated it would be placed from 
his offico at 10 a.m. 

MIRO -also stated that c ^ 3 carae from Panama 
to Miami iu April, 1959, and determined that MIRO was then 
in New York City. MIRO said that <£.©<» ^7then came, to 
Kew York to find MIRO and eocaurage an invasion plan by 
MIRO. 

r 

DAVIDSON stated that MIRO acted very discouraged 
at this December 11, 1959, meeting and roquested that 
DAVIDSON try to arrange for a Job in Nicaragua so he. 


In.WnrMw with b IRVIKC Fil. f gg 97-11S9 

cm 12/11/59 Washington, D. C. Oot . 12/14/59 

ky Spwciol Agent PONALD H0ET1NG . /bsb 


fropettj of FBI - T ku report is l oome d to yoo by tbe FBI, mmd meitkef it mot its tomtemti ore to be distributed ootside tbs 
W«Wf to wbieb loomed, •* 



f ... family UAVIDSOK advised MIRO that 
MIUO, could support his family. t to U0 RALBS at 

all ho could do Is suggest this request * 
the Nicaraguan Embassy. 





FEDERAL BUREAU OF IHVESTU IOM • 
INTERVIEW REPORT — 


December 14, 19S9 


lA//"” 7 "”/ telephoni cal ly advised 
that RUBEN OSCAR MIRO CUAKDIA and LEGPOLDO aRAGCN ESCALCNA ... 
had met with I. IRVING DAVIDSON that afternoon in DAVIDSON* 8" ' 
offlco, 1G12 1C Street, N. Washington, D. C. , as planned. 

He said DAVIDSON advised he had talked with his "contact” 
at the United States Department of State who had Indicated 
that the Department of State is somewhat sympathetic with 
UlKO's plan to overthrow the Panamanian Government but did 
not want to become involved in the matter. DAVIDSON stated 
he was advised that although AK.nULN is all right, he, DAVIDSON, 
should stay away from NIRO as KING is "hot”. DAVIDSON also 
indicated to NIRO and AX AGON he had been advised by his 
"contact” that the Federal Bureau of Investigation had 1'IRO's 
sister's telephone "bugged” even before V.XKO got Into the 
United States. DAVIDSON advlsvo therefore that he wanted 
absolutely nothing to do *:*.h Vl'tO's plan as he did not 
want to get In trouble with the United States Government. 

According to the informant, when NIRO learned this 
he voiced the opinion that the bailed States desired to keep 
liiw here so it could k*>< .5 in eye on hie and he asked DAVIDSON 

If DAVIDSON could arrauge for him to go to "Nicaragua where he 

could remain for a few e.onths and "sec how things work out". 

The infornant stated DAVIDSON made no promises concerning 
this but told M1R0 he would have liCXALES at the Nicaraguan 
Embassy send a message to Nicaragua and see if this could 
be arranged. The informant sa:d DAVIDSON did not further 
identify MORALES but informant belteved' MORALES is a military 
attache at the Nicaraguan Embassy. 

Informant said L'lKC attempted to call from 
DAVIDSON's office the nan in Panama who can supposedly 

vouch for him and for the fact that the United States will 

turn its back on KIKO's planned invasion. He was unable 
to complete the call but is suppesed to try again from 
DAVIDSON's office at 10.00 a.e. on December 14. 19S9. 

The informant said that NIRO, using the name, 

CARLOS VASQUEZ, tried to place this call person-to-person 

Interview *i,k WF / ~ 7 File f »TO 97-1159 

on 12-11-59 m Washington, D, C. Date Dictated: 12-14-59 

ky Special Apent RICHARD B. KELLOGG/ AJC 

"S 

frmpmtt* •/ FBI - 7 hi » rrpo*t u I ommtd *.♦ J9* by tk* FBI. mmd metiktr it mot Mi tomttmts t* to kt dut'ikmtwd 
m£cmcy't* * Ju rk taanmd. 


i 





I 




trO 97-1159 

/** *3fnhonoticl St Panama City, Panama, C -3 

taJ-~ 0*? , ■ I r tr * r 7 Is affiliated with the 

Ho saio fc iKO claimed J contacted UIRO 

Central Intelligence Agency . . th»« £. » frOB aod 

in the United States aft«.r tIRO athetic v t t h UIRO's cause 

told hi- the United States was sympathetic with Mi 

and would look the other way 1 "^fendedV * ^ J 

Tho informant said I.IRC also whei^.Ofc 3 was 

in a trial in Panama several yo -rs - *° **”“ robbery or 

accused, along with two other Americans. in a robbery or 

burglary. 

The informant advised that from UIRO's reaction 
ho believes U1KG Was r.o immediate plans for o 
backing for his revoluntionary movement . The 1 n for 
also indicated it is his belief that AUAC.Oh will have 
nothing more to do with HI 1:0 in this regal d. 





f 


FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGA. M 

^ INTERVIEW REPORT 


December 16. 


On December 1U, 1959, Mina PATRICIA BOLAND, 
Secretary to I. IRVMO DAVIDSON, Suite 306, 1612 K 
Stree t, W.W«, Washington, D. C., tel aphonic ally advised 
that RU3EH KIRO vlsitod DAVIDSON 1 o office at 10:30 a.o. 
on December JJ*, 1959, to placo a telephone call to 
C» '’^4 telephone number Panama City, 

Panama, 


Mias BOLAKD abated that after one and one half 
hours KIRO was still unsuccessful in getting his call 
through toC.0-3jui& MIRO decided to have his call 
transferred to nls, MIRO's, wife In Panama. 

After the termination of the call to MIRO's 
wife, KIRO stated to Miss BOLAND he would telephone 
DAVIDSON later that day. Miss 30LAHD stated KIRO 
never called back as he a&id he would. Miss BOLAND 
said MIRO's conversation with hia wife was in Spanish, 
a language she does not understand. 


I>litYU , Miss PATRICIA BOLAND F8U f VPO 97-115? 

« Vashlngton, D. C. Do ,. 4ict „,.w . 12 ~ 1 ^ 

Special Ag«nt DONALD H OSTIMO^pe p 

Xkle licastsl contelae mRWi tece»»ee4e»>eae set egacleeioea el «Ae f||. If Is Ik* • r H* rt T **• ** * # 

Mgg g, <>rT ; tt and US ceeteeia S'e set I# k* 4l*lftteled eeleltfe r**r 

17 







j ■ . - ' • 

I f^'ERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGA'. >-« 

Y INTERVIEW REPORT 

! " " * 

j * / . n»t. December 16. 1959 


On December 15, 1959, 1. IRVING DAVIDSON, 

1612 K Straet, N.W. , telephonies lly advised that he 
returned to Washington, D. C., froa Miami during the 
evening of Docember 14, 1959, and, therefore, was not 
present when MIRO arrived at his, DAVIDSCN's, office at 
10:30 a.o., December 14, 1959. DAVIDSON stated that MIRO 
was to make a telephono call at that time to J 

at telephone number C*s> Panama City, Panama. 

DAVIDSON stated that according to his secretary, 
I Miss PATRICIA BOLAND, MIRO placed the call tc € ^but 

• after one and one half hours without success, MIRO had the 

j call transferred €o his, MIRO's, wife who resides in 

i Panama. 

DAVIDSON said that he does not plan to engage 
in any activities with MIRO and is not going to request 
MORALES of the Nicaraguan Embassy to find a Job in 
• Nicaragua for MIRO. 


Int*rrl*» wits I. IRVING DAVIDSON Fil# # WFP Q7.11SQ 

12/15/59 at Washington, -D. C. Dot* rfictat.4 12/15/59 

k* Sjxciot Aj.nt DONALD H0ETING:pep/v1h 

TV l* decemeet con to las ullUi f*cemmea4«UOM aer cooeNalooa •( Ike Pit. It U Ike p ro party el Ike PBI a*4 Am loam* 4 ta 
fo ot tfe ecy; St «o4 Urn «n*t*ata at* mat ta ke tuifllralad oatald* yarn* ««**cy. 

\ S I 


I 


> IM-III 


’EDERAL BUREAU OF IHVESTIGAT 
• -N INTERVIEW REPORT 


Decimber 17, 1959 


1. IRVING DAVIDSON, Suite 306, 1612 K Street, 

N. W., Washington, D. C., furnished the following inforaation 
relative to the sequence of events surrounding his meetings 
with RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD1A and LEOPULDO ARAGON ESCALONA. 
DAVIDSON said his recollection was not too clear regarding 
the exact sequence of these events, but the following is 
to the best of his recollection. 

When he was informed by his friend at the labor 
union about December 7, 1959, about K1R0 and ARAGON, he was 
given the names of both of those persons along with MlRO's 
telephone number. He said he ttied unsuccessfully to call 
M1R0 and left his number with a request that M1RO call him 
back. He stated M1RU did call, in appointment was made, and 
Ml kb came to his "office and told him about his proposition. 
DAVIDSON said later that day he was told by his friend 
from the labor union that ARAGON had attempted to call him 
and when unsuccessful left a note for him. DAVIDSON 
said this man asked him to see if he could contact 
ARAGUN and "get him off of the union's bach." DAVIDSON 
said he called ARAGON and asked him why lie continued to 
contact the union when he DAVIDSON, had already seen MIRO, 
and ARAGON answered that he wanted to see who it was that 
M1RO was dealing with so DaVIDSUN inwicJ ARAGUN to his 
office. He said ARAGON did come to his office later that 
morning and DAVJDSuN told him he saw no reason to talk 
with him when MIRO was not present as • hey were apparently 
together in this matter and whi 1c ARAGON was still there 
they called MIRO and arranged fo* hoc : N.lko and ARAGuN 
to r.cet with DAVJDSuN ir. his jffiic th-**t j f tcrn.*on . ile 
said that meeting aid take pla.r =?s did another reeling 
two days later an-J cn each • i'- best '-v. VI Da ON could 

recaH'. ARAGuN and MIRO were waiting Tor him at his o*Tice 
when he got there so he did ne t know i i they came together. 

DAVJDSuN said o:i the asi'.i of his second 
meeting with ARAGON and MIRO he told MIRO, in older to 
get rid of him, that he was ten •N't’ for him to associate 
with, lie said to impress him further along this line, he 
told him that v.lKU's activities were being watched and,’ 
in fact, MIRO should be careful what he says on the telephone 
as his telephone is probably 'bugged." DAVIDSON said no 


,_b_ IRVIXC. IttVIDSttL 


12/16/59 


Washington- D. C. 


„ Fii. I JVBL2ZJJ52 ___ 

Date Dictated: 12/16/59 


by Special A.9*nlS_J£lCl'.AKD_B. — KELLOGG— ) 

#/ FR! - f hi* to »o* fcj tk* FBt. t 

mft+ey to L***rd. 


4iOI71'lNG:kar 


bar m ttmt-mt* ve A# duVtltJed e*lna> I 


WFO 97-1159 
RBK:kar 


1 



one had told him this and he had no reason to believe it to 
be true, and he only said it in an effort to get rid of 
MIRO. 

DAVIDSON also adtised that ARAGON called him 
on December 15, 1959, for an appointment and came to his 
office at about 2:30 p.m. that same date. He said ARAGON 
explained he is as much interested in seeing the Government 
of Panama overthrown as MiRO is, but cannot agree with 
MIRO’s solution to the problem and wants no' part of 
violence, lie said ARAGON said he believed the Government 
of Panama is so shaky that it would take very little to 
topple it and his'plan was to utilize propaganda and 
pressure at the proper places and at the proper times to 
cause the downfall of that government. DAVIDSON said - 
ARAGON asked if he would be interested in backing such a 
move or if he knew anyone wnu would be and DAVIDSON 
answered him in the negative in both instances. 

DAVIDSON said ARAGON argued that DAVIDSON, 
as a representative of the Go. eminent of Nicaragua, should 
be very much interested in Panama as Nicaragua would 
undoubtedly siffer if the 'Cuoan communists" gained control 
In Panama.' He said he told ARAGON if he had any such 
information, he should pass it on to the Nicaraguan 
Ambassador as he, DAVIDSON., only represents Nicaragua in 
commercial matters. DAVIDSON said he refused ARAGON's 
request that he introduce ARAGON to the Nicaraguan 
Ambassador. 



2C- 



i 




rO-Ht It-to-lH 


i" * - 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF IHVESTIC "'N 
INTERVIEW REPORT 

n... 12/17/59 


RUBEN OSCAR MIRO CCftRDIA, who resides in 
Washington, D. C., with his sister , Mrs. PAULTOWA DE, at 
2901 Park Drive, 5. E., was interviewed at the Washington 
Field Office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

He was advised that he need make no statement, that anv 
statement he made could be used against him, and that he 
had a right to legal counsel. 


MIRO advised he did not return to Panama in 
early October, 1959, as he had previously stated he planned 
to do, because he feared that if he were in Panama, he 
would be blamed, unjustifiably, for the continual demonstrations 
against the Panamanian Government. He said he has recently 
been engaged in an attempt to obtain employment with some - 
international organization, either in the United States, _ 
or somewhere outside of Panama, in Latin America. He said 
if he is successful in obtaining this employment, he dees 
not plan to return to Panama for at lease five years, but 
added he had no immediate prbspects for such a job. 

MIRO was .specifically asked whether or not he 
had been attempting to obtain in the United States, financial 
backing for an invasion of Panama and claiming, in that 
regard, that he had been prwuti that the United States 
Government would "look the other way," if such an invasion 
took place. He at first denird that he had done either 
and later said that since he had bceu assured he would not 
have to say anything, he preferred to go on record as saying 
that he neither affirmed nor denied the allegations, but 
rather, refused to discuss them. 

When asked about C. ^ MIRO said he 
first met £ob in Panama, around 1940, or 1941, when he 
defended t- hu J, who was c&argei as an accomplice in a * 
murder caRe. He said he beite'es C 0* 3 is associated with 
a United States intelligence agency because of his activities 
and apparent contacts, bu* ds-ni-td that A pfcj bad told him 
the United States Government would "loo£ the other way," 
if MIRO instituted an in.au u to overthrow the Panamanian 
Government. 


toi.rvi.w with RUBEN OSCAR MIRO CUARDIA File f WFO 97-1159 

•n 12/17/59 01 Washingtoo, D. C. Dot* dictated . J2/17/.5.3. 

by Special A,»mS HERBERT. J . MORGAN , JR. RICHARD B . KELLOGG ;ekb 


frvptrtj rf FBI • TkU rtpon u loam*/ ta jom lj U» FBI. vU mtiikau mor a, ci-r.li or. la Sc d"« raided ttfiUi «*« 
affacy i« b-An* Imu/« 




Q 


V ^ DBF 3?*r/ I 


nut** 97" H59 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
* federal bureao or IN testicatiok 

Washington, D. C, 

DEC 2 5 1953 • 


If 

t l 


SSS »: 

WP T-l utilised ln the d r ®^tloned 83 ° above baa 
Herbert J. Korgan, Jr.^d tcltnt n number*of times to Judge 
not been contacted a surricxo. 
hla reliability. 

^ I 









DECLASSIFlCWnOW AMVOR 
RELEASEOF THJ$ DdCUMBfl- 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OK JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BIRLAl OF INVESTIGATION 


a»»v* 

hk Nk 


Miaai, Florid* 
Hay 26, 1964 


RE: x 'RUBEN OSCAR M1R0 GUARD LA 
INTERNAL SECURITY - PANAMA 




RUBEN OSCAR NIRO GUARD IA, a Panaaanian ciCitan 
and attorney, with offices located at Place da Fraocia 4, 

Panam City, Panam, was interviewed by the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation (FBI) at Miaai, Florida on February 10, 1964. 

MIRO, aaong other things, furnished the following 
inform tioo: 

He departed froa Pa nans City on February 7, 1964, 
and went to San Juan, Puerto Rico at the invitation of MAX - 
GROSOj a Cuban who Is connected with the London Distributing 
Coapany, distributors of vending mchlnaa. GROSO ms interested 
In soliciting Chad's cooperation In placing a* quantity of . 
vending mchlnes/Ssuch as Saeburg phonographs, on a trial 
basis In Panam. GRQSO was attsspting to dispose of som 
sixty of these mchinSs, which he desired to ship to Panam 
froai Jam lea. MIRO said he counseled GR08O not to send r 
these mcblnes to Panam at this tlm. 


MIRO renalnad in San Juan, Puerto Rico until cowing 
to Miaai on the evening of February 9, 1964. He indicated 
his only reason for a stopover In Miaai ms for personal 
shopping and pleasure purposes. Be indicated his visit ms 


REVIEWED BY FBI/JFK TASK 

fan 

ON 

□‘^RELEASE IN FULL'- ^ 

. 5/ RELEASE IN PART 
□ TOTAL DENIAL 

0 ^6 >-T . CSfiKV-; 


1 


\ 





RE: RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD LA 


in no way connected with bis political aspirations in Panama, 
explaining that ha Is a candidata for election as a 
Deputy to the National Asseably in that country. In the * , 

elections to be held In Nay of 1964. ' 

m t-iJI 

.jj advised on February 11, 1964, 
that he had learned MIRO had gone to 8an Juan, Puerto Rico 
froa Panama for business purposes. Re had learned that MIRO's 1 

travel expenses were paid by a group in San Juan, Puerto Rico. 

MIRO had explained the San Juan group was interested in the 
operation of a number of vending Machines which they felt 
MIRO would be able to handle for then. W T-l pointed out 
that MIRO subsequently case to Miani, Florida for shopping 
purposes, as wall as pleasure, and stated he personally knew 
that MIRO had gone to the Hialeah Race Track on February 10, 

1964. Mf T-l pointed out that MIRO planned to return to 
Panawa on February 11, 1964. 

MM T-l stated he felt that MIRO's trip was in no 
way connected with his political aspirations In Fsnawa, and 
that there was nothing questionable concerning MIRO's visit 
to Puerto Rico and Miami, Florida. He stated MIRO is very 
popular with the middle and poor class, of people in panama, 
and felt MIRO had a good chance of winning a seat as a 
Deputy of the National Assembly In the elections to be held 
In May of 1964. 

On April 1, 1964, the Washington Field Office furnished 
the following information: 

On March 9, 1964, .a search was made of the 
records of the Central Office, Immigration and naturalisation . 






RE: RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD LA 

A 



Service (INS), Washington, D. C., concerning MIRO. These 
records contain "Arrival -Departure Record" forms, reflecting 
hawks admitted at Washington, D. C. , on October 1, 1959 on 
af^ B-2 (temporary visitor for pleasure) visa, issued September 9, 
193$, at Panama City, Panama. He arrived via Rational 
Airlines (HAL) Flight 106 frost Havana, Cuba. Ha departed 
August 9, 1960, from Miami via Pan American Airways (PAA) 
an route to Panama.. He waa again admitted on February 7, 

1964 at Miami, Florida on a B-2 visa, issued February 5, . 

1964 at Panama. On both entries, his permanent address 
was 830 - 3rd Street, Panama City, Panama. 

On May 15, 1964, Ml T-l advised he had learned MIRO 
had arrived at Miami, Florida Chat date. He ascertained 
that MIRO mas staying at the Ponce de Leon Hotel,* 231 last 
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida. 

On May 15, 1964, EDUARD TELIA, Clerk, Ponce de 
Leon Hotel, Miami, Florida, advised MIRO checked into the 
hotel at 8:00 AM on May 15, 1964. He indicated his permanent 
residence to be 3rd Street, #830, Panama Cityt Panama. 

S » - 

On May 17, 1964, Mr. TELIA related that MIRO made 
a telephone call to the Dominican Republic (DR) from the 
hotel sometime during the early morning hours of May 16, 

1964. MIRO called npmber 29071, and talked to someone at that 
nueber for approximately two minutes . TELIA mas unable to 
furnish any additional information concerning the telephone 
call. 

On May 18, 1964, TELIA advised that MIRO bad made 
telephone calls to local Miami numbers since his arrival, 
which are set forth as follows: 


3. 




# 






RK: RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD ZA 

JE 2-2311 • 

J3I 6-2391 

V' ’ ’ 

• ~ CA 1-6076 

a. 

FR 1-1745 (which had bno changed to 691-1775) 
FR 4-0428 * ■ ** 

• 624-5336 
x ' jlr 6-1005 

TELLA also related that MIRO had received a 
■easage to call OLGA, RIVERO at Mlaal telephone 373-8066. 

v f 





ro-ioi m»*. i-js-«o) 


FEDERAL bureau OF INVESTIGATION 


i 





Dai* HlkLbk 


lacordt of tb« Southern Dull Telephone and 
Telegraph Coaperj, Klaal, Florida (IIBT&T) raflacc tba 
following info nation concerning eubacribere of nuabere 
•at forth bclor: 

a 

JK 2-2311' la 1 la tad to tha national Hotal , 
1677 Collina Aiaaua, Klaal Baach, Florida 

HI 6-2511 la liatad to tha Barilla Hotal, 

162 Aleaaar Araaua, Coral Gablaa , Florida 

CA 1-6076 la liatad to LO0XS A. FZLOB, B270 
Boutbvaat 11th ftrraco, Klaal* Florida 

n l^MS, changed to 691-1775* la liatad 
to JXSB likBKUXAl * 6337 Hortbaaat 24th Court, 
Klaal. Florida 

a 

FI 4-0426 la liatad to 1SABSL 6. BUJDL. 1526 
Horthaaat Sac and ftraat* Klaal, Florida 


624-5336 la liatad to BYBD FOLIUM, Apartaaat #12, 
240 Hort b aa a t 193rd Stxaat, Klaal, Florida 
’ i 

JK 6-1005 la liatad to LOGXS FLQKIO, Apartaant #10, 
653 Waat Araaoa, Klaal loach, Florida 7 

f 

373-8066 la liatad to OLGA I. AOBTZH, 355 BoutlMt 
22nd load, Klaal, Florida 

Tha ah ora raeorda arc confidential, and can ha 
aada public only upon tha laaoaaca of a a ub poana dncaa 
,, tacua. ihla aubpoana ahoald ha dime tad to Mr. FBBBT0K M. 
C OU . XW , South Florida Maaasar, BBUff Coanany, Klaal. 

Florida, or hla autborlaad rapraaaatatlra. 



5/20/64 ^ Klaal, Florida . . * Kl ml < 97-2*1 


•pmlal Agent UMAX L 81AFF0BD, JR.tpla 5/25/64 

fcy \ gy— -Dot* dictated 

con to loo nolthar race* Mandat lona nat conclualoaa el tfce PBI* It 4i t6« proper If el tba FBI aed la loaned to 
fee# ««a«cy; It aed Ha coetanta era not to be dlntrlbutad outalda yo«f fleecy. 



FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 


, !».u. _3 726/64 

1 \ 

t 

tecords of cbo Southern Boll Telephone and 
Tola graph Caapany (SSTLT) , Mi— l, Florida, raflact 373-IM6 
U auhacrlbad Co by OLGA B. AUSTIN, 355 South— at 22od toad, 

HI— 1 , Florida. Iba wu idaneifiad aa an un —ployed bous— ife, 
owning bar ho— at fcba aho— addrua. Bar husband, OSMOND AUSTIN, 
«— idaneifiad aa aa aaploy— of tba Hamm Ca— 1 Bo—, —eking 
la tha Lock Divialon of Cha Hi— Fiona Locks in tba Pa— 

Canal Bo—. 

‘ . • 

Talapho— sarvica at cha above address had been in 
efface froa August of 1963 uaell April of 19*4. It —a 
disconnected In April of 1964, and reconnected on May 2, 19*4. 

V • 

' . Talapho— records —tad that AUSTIN'S husband is 

due to retire in about t— years. ^ 

The above records an confidential and can be —da 
public only upon issuance of a subpoena due— tec—. This 
subpoena should bo directed to Mr. FBBSTOM M. COLLINS, South 
Florida Ms— gar, SBTbT Coapany, Kiaal, Florida, or hie 
authorised npns— estiva. 



TM* doc Meant contain* Milker ncoauaendelione nor concluaiofi. of the FBI. fe i* the property of the FBI and i. loaned to 
yew agency; it nod tU content. are not to be dietnht^d out .id. your n**ncy. 





I 


- CO 


L 


> 5 


RE: 



RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD IA 


On February 11, 1964, MM T-2, another government 
agency which conduct# security end Intelligence Investigations, 
acquired Information from a Cuban national exile with 
good contacts among Cuban exiles, as follows: 

At 4:00 AM on February 7, 1964, CARL08 JOVAHK GUXHA1D, 
Panamanian, 37 years of age, son of CARLOS JOVANR and EOS IMA 
GUIMARD, Panamanians, was arrested by members of the Guard la 
Maclonal (GN - Rational Guard), Panama, Republic of Panama, 
shortly after his arrival at Tocumen International Airport, 

Panama, Republic of Panama, from Miami, Florida, aboard 
PAA Flight #81. Ha was arrested on chargee of smuggling 
explosives and weapons Into Panama. 

s 7 * On the seme flight arrived one MIGUEL MURCIARO, 
a Cuban national, described by Mf T-2 as a possible agent 
of Cuban Premier FIDEL CASTRO. MURCIARO claimed tohs e 
professional pilot," with residence at 561 Southwest 37th 
Avenue, Miami, Florida, where he claimed to operate or be 
employed with the United American Associates, Inc. His 
business telephone In Miami was set forth as 444-7581. 

MURCIARO disappeared on February 7, 1964, and was being 
sought by members of the Dspartemento Maclonal da Inves tlgac loses 
(ONI - Rational Department of Investigations), Panama, for 
questioning concerning his possible connection with CARLOS 
JOVAHK GUIMARD. MJICIAMO was believed to have ends previous 
trips to Panama connectad with the smuggling Of weapons* 

On those peat occasions, tits weapons probably were consisted 
to or received at tie airport by people having parliamentary 
' Ity. .tfebes Pseuj&qq to tfcft Panama Rational Assembly, 

OSI 

persons with a well-known revolutldnary^backgrouad, ( such 
as RUBEN NIRO, Panamanian qttorney, aqd<4fcOBEklO H TIT0^ > nR IA8^£/l 1 
former Panamanian Ambassador to Great Rrltaln. ^ . . 

no / - 3 37 


C if: rt Cl * L * “ 

6<r 






i 




, X* 



% 


7 


( 



/ 



*• MK T-2 continued that JOVANE's arrest was probably 

affactad because of .the failure of the contacting individuals 
to appear on tine at the airport to help -4.nc leering hla 
baggage through "hnasaniaftui toei . Tt ' s ' * 

KURCIANO was considered a dangerous pro-CASTRO 
indivldualf'gnd allegedly had been reported as having been 
engaged in similar activities in the Congo area. It bad 
been reported that MURCIANO, on one of his previous tripe 
to Panama, attempted to charter for seven hours a plane 
for $12,000 from* local air cargo fin in the Republic of 
Panane, the Pans van/ beaded by GUILLERMO "BILLIE" FORD, a 
wealthy Panaaanlan business wan. One of the wain stockholders 
of this fin is MANUEL J. CASTILLO, a Panamanian citlsen. 
MURCIANO stated to CASTILLO At the tine that he wanted the 
plane to transport "certain merchandise" to Colombia. CASTILLO 
bee ana suspicious, and assuming that the so~called*torchandise" 
could be sons kind of a contraband, refused MURCIAMO'a request. 

- Mf T-2 related it* was believed that MURCIANO, on 
hla first or second trip to Panane, stayed at the home of 
OLGA RIVERA DE AUSTIN, a naturalised United States citlsen of 
Cuban extraction, who was residing at 0838 Ana dor load, 

Balboa, Canal Zone. It was Mf Turn's source's opinion that 
MURCIANO night have sought asylun at AUSTIN'S residence or 
at one of lpir close friends' hone in the Canal Zone. It was 
believed that MURCIANO was probably traveling under a special 
tourist document. or a forged passport. 

with 

r : 

!. 


The OLGA RIVERA DE AUSTIN nay be identical 
OLGA RIVERO called by MHO* at Mlanl, Florida. 

8 . 



. v 











1 



RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD 1A 


On May 7.9, 1964, DOKALD RICHARD SANDERS, also'} known 
as "RED", residing In Apartment #10, 653 Vest Avenue, Miami 
Beach, Florida, fcilAfchone JE 8rl005f**$d^niahad the following 
information: j 

SANDERS was bom in Oklahoma, and was actii* a$ an 
oil driller and in the construction business for a numbei of 
years. He served in the United States Marine Corps (USMcj) 
until 1945, at which tine he was discharged for medical reasons, 
and is currently receiving a disability compensation from 
the Veterans Administration (VA) . During the period 1958; and 
1959, SANDERS, who had previously served in the USMC in Cuba, 
spent a considerable amount of t*ime in Cuba in connection! 
with a construction job and seaport project. | 

I 

SANDERS identified himself as a close friend of 1 
FRANK ANTHONY STURGIS, also known as FRANK FIORINI, an 
American soldier of fortune who at one time served in the ; 
Cuban Air Force under Cuban Prime Minister FIDEL CASTRO. 


SANDERS further identified himself as being 
friendly with various antl-CASTRO leaders and some Panamanian 
personalities, indicating he had married a Panamanian 
girl and had worked in Panama on several occasions in 
connection with construction projects. 

SANDERS said he had, during the. past several years, 
become acquainted with RUBEN MIRO. I 

$ 

. On May 18, 1964, RUBEN MIRO and SANDERS met 

coincidentally on Vest Flagler Street in downtown Miami.* 

MIRO stated he was planning to spend several days in Miami. 

On the evening of May 18, 1964, SANDERS drove MIRO to the 


®C6PY 




• * " *' • ' v -"» '■*?*£**.' 

Vi>l-r . 90 7 


RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD IA 


residence of HOWARD EDWARDS. EDWARDS resides at 240 
Northwest ,H3cjLS treat, Miami,* Florida, and has^telepbgae .-JL 
SMKr 624-5336” SANDERS'ld.ntUl.d EnUIDS if^S* W *** 

owner of the Mercy-Wood Hospital, which was formerly thd 
Monroe- Jsckson Hospital in Hollywood, Florida. Accordltlg 
to SANDERS, this hospital is now closed for financial \ , 
reasons. \ 

SANDERS said M1R0 had become acquainted with < 
EDWARDS in Panama several years ego in connection with a\ 

real estate deal. - ) 

» 

| 

1 After meeting at EDWARDS' residence, the threat 
individuals had dinner at the Sands Restaurant, located oh 
Highway 441, Just north of the Dade County Line in Broward 
County. SANDERS related that EDWARDS and MIRO talked about 
the development of certain properties in Panama, and MIRO 
waa trying to induce EDWARDS to put some money into the j 
development of the property. SANDERS stated there was 
nothing questionable that occurred during the conversation 
between EDWARDS and MIRO. 

SANDERS continued that he mentioned to FRANK 
STURGIS that MIRO was in town, and thereafter SANDERS and 
STURGIS made an appointment to see MIRO on May 19, 1964. 

They met for lunch in downtown Miami at noon on that date. 
SANDERS stated that MIRO and STURGIS spent approximately 
two hours "shooting the bull" about each other's experiences 
in Cuba. SANDERS described STORCIS as a braggart and egdtist, 
who dominated the conversation. SANDERS related that MIRO 
did discuss the current political situation In Panama In 
general terms. 


- •• 


»>* i 


A 

H<‘-, - 


RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD LA 


After lunch, SANDERS and STURGIS drove HIRO to the 
Hong Kong Restaurant, .located at 147 Northeast .Second t \ 
Avenue, where tHif waited in the automobile' whill 'rfl.RO went 
In to visit an unidentified person, with whoa he spent < 
approximately five minutes. SANDERS said he was planning 
to drive MIRO to the airport in order that he might take 
a flight back to Panama City that afternoon; however, MIRO - 
said it would not be necessary, that he had arranged transport! 
for a woman to drive him there. MIRO did not identify this t 
female by name. f 

j 

On May 19, 1964, Mi T-l advised he had knowledge of 
some activities of MIRO during his Miami visit. ! 

* ! 

MM T-l related that on May 17,^1964, HOMERO VIDAL . 
VELASQUEZ FERNANDEZ, a Panamanian citizen- who has been 
engaged in some revolutionary activities in 'the past,- arrived 
at the Miami- International Airport 0(14) aboard an APA Panama; 
Airways Flight at approximately 6:30 PM on May 17, 1964. 

That sabe evening, VELASQUEZ was visiting at the 
home of a Panamanian citizen, whom MM T-l identified as 
ERNESTO FILOS, 805 East 32nd Street, Hialeah, Florida. While 
at FILOS* realdence, RUBEN MIRO came by to visit ERNESTO FILOS, 
and Ml T-l described it as a coincidental meeting. MIRO 
was accompanied by a friend, described by MM T-l as ENRIQUE 
NUNEZ, a Panamanian' citizen employed as an automobile mechanic 
In a Standard Oil station located at Southwest 8th Street and 
12th Avenue, Miami. 

MM T-l said that VELASQUEZ was one of the three 
organizers in the political campaign of MARCO ROBLES, who 
was the successful Presidential candidate in the Panamanian 




^•fl- 


irtation 


C 


cm 




r 

i 



RE: RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD IA 


elections held in May of 1964. MM T-l commented that VEIASQUEZ 
had appeared quite content over the results of the election, 
and it was MM T-l's belief that VELASQUEZ will now be selected 
to/^akl k Cabinet- post in* fchi ROBLES Jovernieht. MM T-l 
recalled that VELASQUEZ had stated that ROBLES favors a i 
program of agrarian reform in Panama, and that VELASQUEZ 


is going to push that particular program, and indicated hei 
had personally told ROBLES that should ROBLES later oppose . 
it, VEIASQUEZ would go against him. ) 


MM T-l related that MIRO was a candidate on the 
ticket of the unsuccessful Presidential candidate, ARNULPO 
ARIAS. MIRO had little comment to the remarks of VELASQUEZ. 

i 

MM T-l advised that VEIASQUEZ departed from the MIA 
on NAL Flight 604 at 10:00 PM, May 17, 1964, for Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. He said he was going to Philadelphia to visit 
with his wife, JENNIE, whom he had not seen for approximately 
three months. He did not Indicate when he would return to ‘the 
Republic of Panama. v 


MM T-l went on to relate that MIRO had come to 
Miami, and was planning to go on to Washington, D. C., to contact 
some attorneys. MM T-l stated MIRO indicated he was attempting 
to interest some people in the United States in leasing 
some mining properties in Panama. According to T-l, MIRO 
would have gone to Washington, D. C. to stay for two "or three 
weeks; however, he made several long distance telephone calls 
to that city, and apparently found it unnecessary to go North. 

MM T-l related that MIRO had departed for Panama on May 19, , 
1964. . 

On May 19, 1964, records of INS, Miami, Florida, 
disclosed that RUBEN MIRO GUARD LA departed from Miami on PAA 

12 . 






RE: RUBEN OSCAR MIRO GUARD IA 


Flight 511 at 4:00 PH, May 19, ,1964, wf or Tocumen 
banana. HiA t-94 Form disclosed fit had arrived 1 



and was admitted on cm B-2 visa Kay 15, 1964, valid to 
June 20, 1964. He had arrived aboard PAA Flight 80. His i 
permanent residence was Hated as Central Avenufi #34-90, j 
Panama City, Panama. * His Passport Humber Is 53399. He was 
born October 29, 1911 in Panama, Republic of Panama. 


PROPERTY OF FBI - This document contains neither! 
recommendations nor conclusions of the FBI. It is the 


property of the FBI and Is loaned to your agency; It and Its 
contents are not to be distributed outside your%ency. 





gggTUB E CARD B EPBODOCTlfllt' 


FD-UJ m»r. ll.J««ll 



i« Afrfr. Pt—m H 4m to 
Jib AW 


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

i 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

Miami, Florida 
,.■* May 26, 1964 


Title 


RUBEN08CAR MIRp 


GUARD lA ' 


Character 


Reference 


INTERNAL SECURITY - PANAMA 

Memorandum, dated and captioned 
aa above, at Miami, Florida. 


A1A eourcee (except may listed below) whose identities 
ere concealed In referenced cosmunlcatlon have furnished reliable 
Information in the past. 


. r , f . . • ■ ; 



# ^od'Cj^ ^Lk i i 1 } ; 

• / 6..’«,^ & msMv..c;i ? l'L~ Uq^:; *-£ 


u s - CCPAST.VCVT 0! JUSTICE 

. COMMUKICATiCICS SECTION 

APR 1 7 ; 1959 . du^lk^ 


iu 


AM LWB 




j- , TV'p£ 


§ 


TO DIRECTOR, FBI 
FROM SAC, MIAMI 3P 


tAik$c& 


ma «« 


ter. JiRrr - — < 

P - '*£ i 


Ec ”-°- T£n - 
iCjKi lt£. 


. r^v 1 ^ _ , 

^PANAMANIAN REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES, FPM-PANAMA * REbURAD APRIL 



SIXTEEN. ON APRIL SIXTEEN, JOSEP H MER .Q1X* CONFIDENTIALLY AND ^ 

i. r __H_ | Ut -t-**- S 5 .£ l -VI 

VOLUNTARILY FURNISHED FOLLOWING. RUBEN MIRO CAME MIAMI FROM HAVAUg: ff ?§ jjJJ 

© it £\l 

APRIL SIXTEEN. MIRO HAS RECEIVED CASH, IN FORM OF CHECK FOR O.NE*£l-;c3S 


^LLHOUSAND DOLLARS AND CLAIMS PROMISED Tl-’ENTYFIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS * 

Jh Additional for purpose carrying out panamani* ...vision. money g^ 

^i!si IR0 IN HAVANA "bY CHICAGO, ILL., ATTORNEY VICTOR'uToULDINC ON BEHAlF 

• ~ 

UNIDENTIFIED GREEK. MIRO TO GIVE GAMBLING CONCESSIONS PANAMA TO 

*5tJ - 

>rjS jJATTER INDIVIDUAL. THIS PERSON ALSO INTERESTED NARCOTICS, MIRO 



i 


-.^ALLEGEDLY TAKING MONEY BUT DOES NOT PLAN CARRY OUT AGREEMENT. miro TOLD 

Fi.MEROLA EIGHTY REVOLUTIONARIES DEPARTED HAVANA APRIL FIFTEEN, FIFfYNINE, 
-'•I. • 

i 

J2 » SOUND FOR NICARAGUA ON CUBAN VESSEL OTHERWISE UNIDENTIFIED. MIRO 

j i 

u s&AYS THIKTYFIVE TO FORTY REVOLUTIONARIES, FOLLOWERS OF ROBERTO ARIAS 
DEPARTED HAVANA APRIL FOURTEEN, LAST ABOARD VESSEL OF FNU^CARCI A . 

GROUP HEADED BY ONE FNU~MERALES ORFTfOR ALES AND STILL EXPECTED LAND dr 

TWELVE MILES EAST OF COLON, PANAMA APRIL SEVENTEEN INSTANT. MIRO-S 

* ~ B 

GROUP HAS NOT YET DEPARTED, JUAN RUFFO SANCHEZ, PANAMANIAN, RE INTERV I EW| 

ftEC- 70 

APRIL SIXTEEN LAST, ADMITTED CALLING COL. SATIJRNINO FtOR ES . PANAMANIAN 

'' - / 7< 

NATIONAL GUARD, PANAMA CITY, PANAMA, APRIL FOURTEE I fT ^TOU flf*UNfi OT HER . 

-■ 1 - 7 EX 1,1 3 % / / ia^ 

THINGS MENTIONED " RESTLESS 1 1” AND WAS TOLD TO CA1 mMMi J /t' 
AMBASSADOR RE MATTER. ADMITS SEVERAL CALLS TO PANAMATTLfttf AMBASSADOR 


RICARDO ARIAS. 


* . .0 


END PACE ONE 




v/// ■- & > 




Hi i 





PAGE TWO 


ftUFFO ESCORTED BY AGENT TO * RESTLESS II * AND POINTED OUT TO AGENT 
GAS TANK HE * PRESUMED * WAS INSTALLED MARCH NINETEEN FIFTYNINE. 

RUFFO DID NOT SEE ACTUAL INSTALLATION BUT SAW MEN WORKING ON G AS LINES 
LEADING THERETO. U. S. CUSTOMS, MIAMI, OF BELIEF THIS TANK WAS ABOARD 
VESSEL AT TIME OF SEIZURE DEC., FIFTYEICHT. RUFFO CHIMED MET TWO 
WHITE MALES, SPANISH SPEAKING INDIVIDUALS, NEAR * RESTLESS II * 

EVENING APRIL THIRTEEN, LAST. ONE OF THEM ALLEGEDLY NAMED tm** 
MAZOLA*St«£1MjeK -(PHONETIC } CONVERSED WITH RUFFO AND AMONG OTHER 
THINGS MENTIONED RUBEN MIRO AND OTHER PANAMANIANS. THIS PERSON CLAIMED 
HE WAS GOING TO JACKSONVILLE, FLA., APRIL FIFTEEN, FOR MEETING, NATURE 
UNKNOWN TO RUFFO, AND INVITED RUFFO TO r o ALONG. RUFFO UNABLE TO GO 
BECAUSE OF WORK COMMITMENT. RUFFO CLAIMS THERE WAS MO CONVERSATION 
RE ARMS, REVOLUTIONS, OR POSSIBLE PARTICIPATION * RESTLESS II * ON 

i! * 

PART THESE INDIVIDUALS, BUT RUFFO STATED THESE PERSONS OUSTE CAPABLE 
OF REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES. RUFFO ADMITTED DISCUSSING THIS 
MATTER WITH PANAMANIAN AMBASSADOR. RUFFO ADMITTED HEARING REPORTS IN 
PANAMA IN FEB. NINETEEN FIFTYNINE, THAT ROBERTO SAMUDIO, PANAMANIAN 
REVOLUTIONARY, WAS IN MIAMI, ATTEMPTING TO BUY ARMS. RUFFO CLAIMS 
HE HAS NO FIRST HAND INFO THAT ROBERTO SAMUDIO IS, OR WAS, IN MIAMI, 
ALTHOUGH RUFFO ADMITTED DISCUSSING THIS INDIVIDUAL WITH PANAMANIAN 
AMBASSADOR. 



END PAGE TWO 



PACE THREE 



SH^ET 





CIA IN REPORT APRIL FIFTEEN, LAST MAY BE REFERRING TO RUFFO AS 

w 

UNIDENTIFIED INFORMANT AND PANAMANIAN OFFICIAL MAY BE SAT'JRNINO FLORES 
IN VIEW RUFFO-S CALL TO THAT INDIVIDUAL. BUREAU REQUESTED CONFIRM THIS 
THROUGH CIAj RUFFO CLAIMS' INFO FURNISHED BY HIM HAS BE EN EXAGGERAT ED 
BY PANAMANIAN AMBASSADOR. RUFFO IS OF EXCITABL NATURE, RAMBLES JN 
CONVERSATION, VAGUE RE DETAILS. IT IS BELIEF OF MIAMI OFFICE THAT HIS 
INFO UNWORTHlS FURTHER INQUIRY. MEROLA STATED APRIL SIXTEEN LAST HE 
AND MIRO VISITED " RESTLESS II" THAT DATES AS MATTER CURIOSITY, 
REITERATED ABSOLUTELY NO BASIS FOR BELIEF SHIP WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSE 
PANAMANIAN OR ANY OTHER INVASION. VESSEL WILL CONTINUE TO BE SPOT 
CHECKED AND CAPTAIN PLACIDO GON2ALE2 WILL BE INTERVIEWED UPON RETURN 
FROM CUbA. CUSTOMS ADVISED 
ADVISED AM. 

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l.^FOJ^^IXG NAMES ON LNBEET REPORT ANT 

RE ACTIVITIES , INCLUDING T RA VEL , • OF THE - I NT) I V I DU A LS LISTED BEU^^MICK'' 
IN YOUR JUDGMENT MAY EFFECT THE SECURITY OF THE PRESIDENT DURING . HIS 
EUROPEAN TRIP. £ */■> ' ' RT VR 

0 PLS ATTEMPT TO CONTIRM THE WHEREABOUTS OF THE 'INDIVIDUALS' 
IF THEY ARE LISTED AS LAST BEING IN YOUR A REX. FORWARD ALL IN^^ATION 
BY IMMEDIATE PRECEDENCE CABLE TO HQS AND TO Q&l , lS^2., t*~f 

A. ALBKROLA-SURINACH, OCTAVIO; WHITE \»ALE, BORN 3/4/28 AT 

AIAYO, SPAIN. W HE REA BOUTS UNKNOWN I REPORTED 3/18/70) ALIASES: ELLARGO, 
JUAN ANT) SURIXACH-ALBEROLA, OCTAVIO. CITIZEN OF SPAIN. 'V 

B. ALI-KHAN, TAR IQ; ASIAN MALE, BORN 10/21/42 AT LAHORE W. 

PAKISTAN. LAST KNOWN LOCATION (REPORTED 7/28/G9) LONDON, ENGLAND 
ALIAS: KHAX-ALI , TAHIQ. CIT; PAKISTAN. PAKISTAN PP AC OOIB'OS. 

C. ANTINUCCl, ITALO DEMENTC; WHITE MALE, 3* 3" 135 LBS BROWN 

ILUR, BROWN EYES, BORN 11/30/20 AT TIilANO, ITALY. LAsT KNOWN IjOCVTION 

(RFPOHTED 4/21/G9) PIAN DORTA ITALY. CITIZEN OF ITALY. 

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SVCESJZ.V (REPORTED 2/27/69). U.S. CITIZEN’. U . S . PP G9-I494? .V 

J. DAVIDSON, CRAIG; MALE, LAST KNOWN LOCATION STUTTGART, 

GERMANY (REPORTED 6/1/70) (23 HE I NR I CH-flA UMA NX STRASSE, STL'TTOA IIT , 

gekma ny ) . i s. cit izen, 

K. DAVIS, PAIR. L.; WHITE MALE, 3 MO" 133 LBS, 3V V W HAIR, HUE 
MLS, i-ORN 10/29/2(5 AT NEW YORK , N.Y . LIST KNOWN LOCATION LONDON W. 
ENGLAND ( REPO!? i ED 2/24/69). ALIASES' SOI O' 'ON. SALT.; KING, MILES A.; 
lIEI.VBrlH, CLIFF . CITIZEN OF U.S. LIVING IN EUROPE. 

L. T DAVOREN, EDWARD MICHAEL: WHITE MALE, 3 MO/ i»KO'..*N HAIR, HL’/E 

ETES. nORJf/S/4/40 AT IRELAND. LAST KNOWN LOCATION LONDON ENGLAND 
(REPORTED 6/3/69). ALIAS: DEVOREN, EDWARD MICHAEL. CITIZENSHIP UNKNOWN 

M. LTTSCHKE, RUDOLPH ALFRED WILLIE, WRI TE MALE, 3*7 1-1*1 I.BS , 

P.IACK HAIR, BROWN FIVES/ 'LAST KNOWN LOCATION LONDON NW. ENG l A Vi) ( REPORTED 
10/20/69). ALIAS; DUTSCHKE, HUDI. CIT OF GERMANY . W. GERMAN KKXHXSXRh* 
PP BMS2G11 . 

K. FAI.LET, VERNON ROGER DONALD, WHITE MALE. 3' 9", 163 LBS, 

LKG-N IsA IR, BLUE EYES, BOHN .W/lfO VU Al' li.MBRhS.ioN, N.v I TZEl.ANL*. LAST 

KNOWN LOCATION XEUCHA TEL, SWITZERLAND (KKIUKTKI) 11/7/68). SWISS CITIZEN^ 

O. GKT7, KAR!. IGOR; WHITE MALE, BROWN HAIR, BU’E EYES, HORN , 
5/9/46 AT PARIS, FRANCE. LAST KNOWN LOC AT ION .MUNICH GERMANY (REPORTED 

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11.21/67). ALIAS: GO ETC , KAKL. U.S. CITIZEN. 

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P. GODDARD, MICHAEL ANTHONY VICTOR; WHITE MALE, S’?", BROWN 
ILAIP., HAZEL EYES, BORN 11/29/29 AT HASTINGS SUSSEX ENGLAND. LAST 
KNOWN LOCATION PORT TALBOT, WALES GB { REPORTED 4/4 08). ALIAS: 
GODDARD,- UA: CITIZEN OF ENGLAND . 

9 • GOSZA LEZ-FLECRA , ROSARIO; WHITE FEMALE, BORN 10/28/36 / 

AT SPAIN, LAST KNOWN LOCATION BRUSSELS, BELGIUM (REPORTED 5/L4 '68) . 

R. GRA NSAC-SA DOR I , ARIANE IIENRIETTE; WHITE FEMALE, BORN 
1/6/42 AT TOULOUSE, FRANCE. LAST KNOWN LOCATION PARIS, FRANCE, 
(REPORTED 5/14/68). CITIZEN OF FRANCE. 

S. GVOJICH, MILE; WHITE MALE, 5’7", 160 LBS, BORN 5/14/28 
AT BRNJA VAC, YUGOSLAVIA, LAST KNOWN LOCATION SLBOTICA, YUGOSLAVIA 
PR I SOR (REPORTED 2/19/69). CITIZEN OK YUGOSLAVIA. 

T. HERRANZ-rFERNANDEZ, MARIO; WHITE MALE, BORN 12/28/36 AT SPAIN 

"" - ' CITF7TV or v:n.\ r v 

LAST KNOWN LOCATION BRUSSELS, BEIGIUM (REPORTED 5/11/68). / 

U. HILTUNEN, VILO ALARIK; WHITE MALE, 5* 10", BORN 2/5/09, 

AT HELSINKI, FINLAND, LAST KNOWN LOCATION HELSINKI. FINLAND 
(REPORTED 4/22/67). CITIZEN OF FINLAND. ! 


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CITIZEN OF FRANCE; FRENCH P P 231- 65. 

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V. HUMMER, GISELE MARTHEj/WHITE FEMALE, 5*0" 90 LBS, BORN 

2/7. 13, AT TOURS, FRANCE. EAST KNOWN LOCATION.; REPORTED -1/15/69, 

' ... '* . 

UNKNOWN.' ALIASES: RICHE, GTSELE MAR THE; DEHASBOLRG, 'ANNE-MARIE. 

W. .I0NSS0N, HOROt’K; ••:,*;•£ MALE, 5 1 8’* 187 LBS, BLACK FlAIR, GRAY 
EYES, DORN 3/2/37 AT AKRANES, ICELAND; LAST KNOWN LOCATION AKRANES, 
ICELAND (REPORTED 12/15/66). CITIZEN OF ICELAND. 

X. JULLIEX, JEAN; WHITE HALE, BORN 2/18/35 AT DKI.1.E, FRANCE, 
LAST KNOWN LOCATION PARIS, FRANCE (REPORTED 1/22/70. ALIAS: 

•JULIEX, JEAN. CITIZEN OF FRANCE. 

Y. KING, THELMA ESTELLA ; LATIN FEMALE, 5'9'* 165 LBS, BORN 
1/J1/21 AT PANAMA CITY, PANAMA, LAST KNOWN LOCATION PARIS, FRANCE 
(REPORTED 8/3/70) . ALIAS: .WJIXX* HARRISON, THELMA ESTELLA KING. 
CITIZEN OF PANAMA. 

Z. KUHN, ROBERT; *HITE MALE, 6' 4", 180 LBS, BROWN HAIR AND 
F.AES, BORN 7/4/ 18 AT SIKCEV W , GERMANY, LA ST KNOWN LOCATION MUNICH, 
GERMANY (REPORTED 2/27/69). CIT OF GERMANY. GERMAN PP (>744320-1. 

AA. LOCK, WF.RNER E. ; WHITE MALE, BORN 12/3/34 AT BERLIN 
GERMANY, LAST KNOWN LOCATION PFLUGERSTRASSK 3, AFG 1, WEST BERLIN, 








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GERMANY (REPORTED 4/8/69). ALIAS: BOECK, WERNER. CIT OF - * GERMANY. 1 
BB. LUNDSREN, ASA MONICA; WHITE FEMALE, BORN 11/25/30 AT 


SWEDEN, LAST KNOWN LOCATION LUDVIGBERGATAN 39, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN 
(REPORTED o'H/66 ). CITIZEN OF SWEDEN. 

CC. LUNDGREN, TORD ALVAR, WHITE MALE, BORN 7/10/3 1 AT ? . SWEDEN, . 
LAST KNOWN LOCATION LUDV IGSBERG SATAN 39, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN 


(REPORTED 1/27/67). CITIZEN OF SWEDEN. 

DD. MAHLER, HORST; WHITE MALE, BORN 1 '23/36 AT HAY .VAC SII.ESIA, B 
BROWN HAIR AND EYES. LAST KNOWN LOCATION BERLIN, GERMANY ( REPORTED 
6/10/69). CITIZEN OF GERMANY. 

EE. MANCHANDA, A Bill MANTA; WHITE MALE, 5’7”, BORN 9/4/19, AT 
INDIA. LAST KNOWN LOCATION LONDON ENGLAND (REPORTED 2 '18/69) . ALIAS : 
MX.VCHANDA, MANU. CITIZEN OF BRITAIN OK INDIAN DESCENT. 

FF. MARTIN, EDDIE LEE; WHITE MALE, 6*1", 175 LBS, BLOND HAIR, 
HAZEL EYES, LAST KNOWN LOCATION FRANKFURT, GERMANY (REPORTED 
6/11/70). U.S. CITIZEN. 

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CG. MIHAJI, JOSEPH; WHITE MALE, 5*5” 110 LBS, BROW HAIR, 

IJLUE EYES, AT CEGLED, HUNGARY, LAST KNOWN* LOCATION LONDON, ENGLAND 

(REPORTED 10/8/69). CITIZEN OF ENGLAND. 

: HH. PFISTER, RUDOLPH JOHN; WHITE MALE, 5*10”, 200 LBS, BROWN 

HAIR AND EYES, BORN 7/28/27 AT SEATTLE WASHINGTON, LAST KNOWN LOCATI 

BERLIN, GERMANY (REPORTED 7/29/68). ALIASES: PFISTKR, RALPH; 

SOMERS, WALTER J; SOMERS, ROBERT WALTER; COUNTS, LYLE D. Si COUNTS, 

CITIZEX * U.s. pp 286011, SWISS PP 1197934. 

RAIXBOLT » CLYDE DUANE; WHITE MALE, 5*9" 1 12 LBS, BROWN 

EYES, BORN 10/19/42 AT LAFAYETTE, INDIANA, LAST KNOWN. 

J130642! 

LOCATION LONDON ENGLAND (REPORTED 8/22/69). u.S. CITIZEN. U.S. PP ,* 
RIVERS, BARBARA 

. : ; ^ JJ * WtyKRJLXKlXRXX JOYCE; FEMALE, LAST KNO'vN LOCATION 20 

STRAWBERRY HILL, TWICKENHAM MIDDLESEX, ENGLAND (REPORTED 


3/26^70) . ALIAS: ILABEOUS, CORPUS. CITIZENSHIP UNKNOWN. 


KK. ROMBOUTS, RA AMOND PIERRE LEON; WHITE MALE, G'O", BROWN 
HAIR, BROWN EYES, BORN 1/31/29 AT ANDER LF.CHT BRUSSELS, LAST KNOWN 
LOCATION BRUSSELS, BELGIUM (REPORTED 2/26/69). CIT OF BELGIUM. 
BE&iuM PP 491147. 




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LL. SALVATORE, MARCEL ALBERT; WHITE MALE, 5’ 5" 140 LBS, BLACK 
HAIR, BROWN EYES, BORN 5/23/29 AT AVIGNON VAUCLUSE FRANCE, LAST 

KN<Hfy LOCATION' FRANCE (REPORTED 2 # 2G/7G) CITIZEN OF FRANCE. FRENCH 
PP 211. 

MM. SCHWARTZ, MOLLY THIA; WHITE FEMALE, 5* 2" HAZEL EVES, BORN 
2/3/54 AT NEWARK, N.J. LAST KNOWN LOCATION EUROPE (REPORTED 7/24/70 
.• »y~ - U.S. CITIZEN. ; K / ‘ 

5 - MP ?^^fr^^ IN5TON; - VBGR0 N:ALE » S’ 1 !" 150 LBS, BLACK 
infES^BORN 1/23/30 AT NEW YORK, N.Y. LAST KNOWN LOCATIO! 
W * ENGLAND (REPORTED 2/14/69). LNGOLD REPORTS SUBJECT LAST If 

u.s, Citizenship, subject carries a British pp and claims British 

CITIZENSHIP. 

SLOVACEK, LAWRENCE EVERETT; WHITE MALE. 5* 10“ 215 LBS, 
j*v / ,> ^ R0W ^. £YES * B0RN 4/3/31 A T PONCA CITY, OKLAHOMA, LAST KNOWN LOCATION 
PAR| S» FRANCE (REPORTED 5/17/70). ALIAS: KISLOVACK, LAWRENCE K. 

U.S. CITIZEN. 

r< H.. / 

v < . PP * SUMNER, FREDEKICO 0. BURNLEY; WHITE MALE, 5’ 10“ BROWN 

. ■ ■ . • • ’'«■*. ■ ' 

—. HA I R A j|^D EYES, BORN 2/23/24 AT BOSTON, MASS. LAST KNOWN LOCATION 




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QQ. T03ES, NORBERT JACQUES; WHITE MALE, 5* r 1*0 LBS, BALD 

BROHX EYES, BORN 2/7/16 AT LUXEMBOURG. LAST KNOWN LOCATION 

LUXEMBOURG (REPORTED 6/9/66). LUXEMBOURG CITIZEN. AND PP 11321. 

. RR. ; TOMIATTI, WOLFGANG; WHITE MALE, 5*8” BLOND HAIR, BLUE 

EYES, BORN 3/11/46 AT GERMANY, L\ST KNOWN LOCATION - UNKNOWN 2/27/69. 

CITIZEN OF GERMANY. 

TONE,. 

SS. X3FJJ, THOMAS JACK; WHITE MALE, 6*0" 200 LBS, 3I.0ND HA IR 

BROWN EYES, BORN AT CLEVELAND. OHIO, 10/5/17, LAST KNOWN LOCATION 

BAD VURZACH BAVARIA, GERMANY* (REPORTED 2/27/69). ALIAS: BA KA RICH, 

STATELESS; GERMAN I»P 0046223; RENOUNCED U.S. CITIZENSHIP 
THOMAS JACK. IN 1964; U.S. PASSPORT D 672328. 

TT. YANPREUSS, RITA; WHITE FEMALE, o' 8” 125 LBS, BLOND HAIR, 

BROWN EYES , BORN 10/15/24 AT IIERTE GERMANY', LAST KNOWN LOCATION* - 
, GERMAN CITIZEN: 

UNKNOWN (REPORTED 7/21/70) ALIAS: KLEIN, RITA. GERMAN PP 150197041. 

UU. A’ATER, JOHN JOSEPH (III); MALE, BORN 7/2/ ‘4 8 AT ENID, OKI. A . 

LAST KNOWN LOCATION U.S. ARMY, STUTTGART, GERMANY* (REPORTED 6/1/70). 
U.S. CITIZEN. 

AV. WAITER, "OLRANC, ; 'rtllll'K .MALE, I'LuSD M-A IK, BROWN EA'ES , 3'S" 
BORN 8/27/23 AT CZECHOSLOVAKIA. LAST KNOWN LOCATION-UNKNOWN » 

(REPORTED 2/27/69). GERMAN CITIZEN. 1 


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ww - WILCZVNSKI, ZBIGMEN MAREK; WHITE MALE, BROWN HA IR AND EYES, 
o' 10” 160 LBS, BORN 1/9/41 AT WARSAW, POLAND. LAST KNOWN LOCATION 
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM (REPORTED 7/10/70). ALIAS: WII.CZYNSKI, ZBIGNIEW. 

C V U 2 ! ? , T0 BE POLITICAL REFUGEE FROM POLAND HAVING ENTERED U.S. 

"AT NEW YORK, N . Y . 09/13/68 ; LNYUMA STATES HE IS A PERMANENT RESIDENT 
' ALIEN. . . 

XX. VOLLNTCK, KARI (MRS); WHITE FEMALE, BROWN HAIR, 5’6” BORN 
t/26/36 AT NORWAY, LAST KNOWN LOCATION OSLO, NORWAY (REPORTED 1/6/69). 
CITIZEN OF NORWAY. 

YY. WOLLNICK, PETER; WHITE MALE, 6'4;* BLACK HAIR, BLUE EVES, 
BORN 4/21/27 AT NORWAY, LAST KNOWN LOCATION OSLO, NORWAY (REPORTED 
1/6/69). CITIZEN OF NORWAY. 

2. NO FILE. 


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SUBJECT 


President Jose Ramon GUIZADO 


DATE OF info. 9 July - 20 September 1955 


NO. OF PAGES 
REQUIREMENT NO. RD 


PLACE ACQUIRED 
DATE ACQUIRED 


SOURCEi 


REFERENCES 


2li October 1955 


(b) (1 l) 
(b) (3) 
(C) '■ 


SOURCE EVALUATIONS ARE DEFINITIVE. APPRAISAL OF CONTENT 15 TENTATIVE. 



Curing the past three months the family and supporters of Joss Ramon 0U1ZADQ 
havfe become Increasingly active In their campaign to clear OUIZADO's name and 
to effect hie release from prison, where he le serving a sentence of six years 
and eight months. 1 ~ | B ald that approximately >200,000 

was being spent on this campaign, .which will reach a' climax in October, wheh 
the National Assembly reconvenes. In this campaign members or the families of 
GUIZADO and Rodolfo ST. HALO, the alleged intermediary between 0UI ZAD0 and the 
assassins, are expected to publish evidence Incriminating others. F 
has a copy of ( |letter which was written by Ruben 0.M1KO, the 

confessed assassin, in UhlCh KIRO proclaims the inn ocence cf GUIZADO and in which 
MIRO's position in the assassination is clarified. | [ said that before 

the trial MIRO's mother, who has the original latter, sent si copy to Harmodlo 
ARIAS, who sent copies to President Ricardo ARIAS Espinosa, Alejandro REMON,; 
Minister of Government and Justice, and the National Assembly. | " 

3 aid that Roberto "Tito" ARIAS, Panamanian Ambassador to Oreat Britain, was 7 
implicated in the assassination because of an illegal international monetary 
transaction which allegedly took place between him and Irving Martin Llpetein, 

| * | said that the OUIZADOs had recently received information, • 

for which they paid >10,000, which consisted of statements fr om two witne sses 
who were present at a meeting | " ™ ” ) 

| ^ (during wmcn uose namon 

OUIZADO's implication in the assassination was discussed. At an opportune time 
these witnesses will testify about this meeting. '• 

Jose Ramon "Mon" 0UIZAD0, Jr., the son of the former President, left Panama 
City on 29 July 1955 for Miami, Florida, en routs to Washington, D. C., where 
he planned to conduct family business. Felipe Juan ESCOBAR, OUIZADO'S 1 lawyer, 
Implied that he had been consulted by Mon OU1ZADO before his trip to the United 
States, end he had advisod Mon as to whom he should approach while there. 

ESCOBAR also said that the OUIZADOs believe that the narcotics traffic was 
involved in the assassination and that OUIZADO will soon die whether or not 
ha is released from prison. " 


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gald that when Mon GUIZADO returned from the United States Mon said that 

L , A , , 1 r Latham tha U. S. Investigator who was hired by the Panamanian Ooverrenent 

rStfgate the Lslssination, had told him that all the members of the Invest!- 
to invest^ Including the two detectives from New York, had been bribed by 

!he ?fn^ia^ Oove™t" 8 and that the only foreign investigators to be trusted 
unre Israel CASTELLANOS, the Cuban, and Neman MENDEZ, the Venezuelan, When Mon 
were Israel c Tm iu 0 s told him that Chatham and MENDEZ were the only reliable 

that Chatham, who- is assisting the QUIZADO 
famllv^ln^lts campaign, wi ll try tl > interest a friend of his in the Narcotics 
£SKoi aid will* then provide the GUIZADO family with more - valuable data.l 

| ^idiscusced a recent article about the assassination 

ch~ltppb~ar ed" in "Bohemia ^magazine and certain statements which were published by 


Vhl c h- I pp^ - rea " Tri Bohemia ‘magazine and certain statements wnicn were puoxxsnea oy 
Gasoar BILO Mendez, f— — | believes that it is significant that no leading Panaman- 
ian Government official has refuted any of BILO 

hei i eves that in BILO Mendoz' reference to a diplomat and a top official of the 
Panama Secret Police (PSP) he meant Roberto ARIAS and Jorge Luis ALFARO, former 
r“"!^r fh« PSP. | — - — ~~ | also said that ALFARO lived beyond his means for the 
nnsition he held and he believed that ALFARO was involved in some illicit activity, 
Slth regard to this matter, eaid that Rueeell Chatham told him that ALFARO 

had made many inexplicable trips to Peru. 



7 I Laid that the OUIZADO family hae been offered aesistance in the form of 

arms and ammunition for a coup d'etat at any time that the family wants it. | I 

also said that the offer cams from some high official in the Costa Rican Oovernment, 
but he denied that it was President Jose FIOUERES, The offer was refused because 
tho OUIZADO family Dellevea that it can accomplish its purpose without recourse 
to such means. - : ■ 

8. With regard to the pro-GUIZADO propaganda Which had been appearing in the Panamanian 

Dross particularly in El Dia, I Isaid that the Panamanian Government was 

trying to suppress the violent WllTcTsm of its .officials. President ARIAS approached 
ono of the shareholders of K1 Dia who is pro-OUIZADO and threatened to ruin hi" 
financially if he did not dispose of his shares of stock in the newspaper. GUIZADO 
h<«.famlly owns El Dia stock valued at #10,000, and the family has been 
1 , _ l i additional shares valued at #lj,000. 

9> I Isaid that the QUIZADO family was debating whether or not 

to answer some of tho remarks made by President ARIAS in his speech on 24 ugust. 

The family decided to publish an article in the New York Times stating that the 
trial was a travesty, because President ARIAS in hie speech had quoted the New York 
press as commenting that tha trial had been a Just one. 

10. Moines TORRXJOS, brother of Deputy Hugo TORRIJOS and friend of Ernesto DB LA OUARDIA, 
Jr., said that when DE LA OUARDIA, Jr. accedes to the Presidency he will grant 
amnesty to GUIZADO, ST. HALO, and Luis Carlos HERNANDEZ, and he will send M1R0 to 
Coiba without a trial. - •: * 

n> I said that the OUIZADO family had recently received a 

■ * letter from DIAMOND (fnu;, Who verified the fact that Representative Harold Velde 
had arrived in the Canal Zone as an off icial rep resentative of President Eisenhower 
with regard to the narcotics traffic.* [ | «*ld that DIAMOND is a wealthy, 

Influential Republican in Washington. 

Field Comments -.‘i . 

1. The Panamanian press reported that a rally sponsored by the Central Committee 
for Justice, for Jose Ramon OUIZADO was held on 28 September, 1955. ESCOBAR 


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and Oulllermo MARQUEZ, the attorneys’ forOUIZADO, spokeon the necessity 
for the revision of the trial,' and Ruasell : Chatham was quuUil as,, crying 
that he would like to return to Panama because he ; could "get to the bottom 
of the question". ' : • 




It was reported in the article In Bohemia' written by Armando CRUZ Coboa ■ 
that Representative Harold Velde arrived, in the Canal Zone on 2 December 19^1 
in his position of Chairman of the House Committee on Un-American Activities' 
and met with President RJEMON at the Tivoli Hotel to discuss the narcotics 
traffic, ■ WK ; C 


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INFORMATION REPORT 


[>e<B,e:oegj 


PREPARED AND DISSEMINATED BY 

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 



Tmu» tiiuWiHll 

Hational Defense of the United Static within th* 
meaning of tho Eipioc-age Laws. Tilt* II. U.3.C. 
Sect. 793 amt 794. the transmission or revelation 
of which In any manner to an unauthorised per. 
eon It prohibited by law. 



Fertonalitlei and Factor* Affecting th* 
Gulzado Trial and the Assassination of 
Late President Benda - 


tUPPlKMCMT TO RCfORT « 

, V 


(b)(3) 


PLACE ACQUIRED ftp sou/csj 

Panama 



DATE or iNfORMATioN fDole or doles, on er between which, 
•veals or conrfit/oa* described to report existed) 


To 4- Apr 55 




1. As of 1. Apr 55, three nen hold the political power in Panama. They are: 

a. Alejandro "Toto" B emon , brother at the slain president; 

Be is now Minister of Oovernment and Justice in the Cabinet; has 
a reputation as a ruthless racketeer; is money -hungry; and has 
not the administrative ability and political experience of his 
slain brother. V- V •• • • 

„ - my. .m, 

b. Col. Bolivar Va llarlno, Rtrst Commander of the Quardla > 
Kocional, controls the only armed force in the country of Panama. 

He vas a close friend of Josf Benda end is extremely close to ,.y 

"Toto * n ;■ YVV-<'v,’ 

c. Harmodio Arles, ex -president and owner and publisher of 
the Panama Amertcau^Ta RngHsh and Spanish, as well as of the 
notoriously anti -Gringo daily La Bora, which has the largest cir- 
culation In Panama. Be owns a couple of radio stations and prob- 
ably la the richest man in Panama. Saw In his 70's,Haxaodlo 
Arias Is still mad for political power. From all reports he 

would like to be president again. Be also has four so»e,-o<*iof whore 
he would like to have president of Panama. Beportedly he paid 
an enormous arc to have his son Roberto appointed Aabassador to 
Oreat Britain. Roberto, incidentally, has been mentioned often 
in connection with narcotics smuggling under diplomatic passport 
while assigned to the VS. Arias's other sons art Harmodio, Jr., 
Oilherto and Antonio, The latter was reportedly found at Tocumen 
Airport on one occasion with a whole planeload at dope. At the 
timq Antonio Arias was Aeronautical inspector for the Panama 
government and was flying his own plane so when the discovery 
was made, he £ot back into the plane, took off, and no action 

was taken. ,v /: ■ 

’ 

2. "Toto’’ Reads and Colonel VaUnrlno are 2/3 of the three -man Junta who re. 
portedly would like to take over In Panama. Whether Bsrmodlo Arias would 
Join them or would have someone sit in the Junta while he remained in the 
background is not clear as of this dote JTk Apr 55 J. 



tmirrPf Dissemination /failed to fu/Mfae employees of CM. ATC and Fib and. wflhfa Hale and Defense, to (he fufeJ/feenrt components, olhet 
o/flces producing N/S elements, and hlqher echelons ■ »*■ - 1 * » is jfriHa^ lhilfs fcm dt«ep B yy>ed to consultants, external projects 

er reserve personnel on short term active duty few* ' \ * I CM. A SC, Fit, State at Defense/ 

unless the written permission of the erlqtnafteo otfict mm. A felon and Dtsvomtnolloa, CM, 

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3. Por several vwk* It M?»d certain that the junta maid throw out Prwsi- 
dent Ricardo M. A rins, who 1* able I'M honest md till not go along With 
the junta's roh-=tbe“tr«*j«u*y id » m. The mm«m why thsy hare sot dose 
so, Z hear, are based on the US’s reportedly haring informally advised 
Panamanian political leaders that three president* In 15 days In January . 
1955 vns Panama.'* full qjiota far this year. (Apparently another change 
of gov er n m en t In Panama would he regarded as proof of Pathos* 0 * instabil- 
ity and the U3 would he loath to recognise any d*. f*gft> go re xM we at here 
in Panaoa-- -especially if the removal of able, honest Ricardo Arias were 
Involved. .... . 

k. Panamanian participant* realite that aoo®*wsogoltlfln by the 03 mean* that 
the all-important US°Panam Treaty (called the RoB&x^Slsenhcnrer Treaty 
here in Panama, signed in Panama City, 25 Jen 5$ and ratified by the 
Panama Rational Assembly 10 Hat 55) wrill not he ratified by the TO Senate, - 
as It oust be before it become* effective. Share are so many millions of 
dollars which will come into rams* as a result of the Treaty that even 
the racketeer* hesitate to do anything to delay ita ratification. Actu- 
ally, the Treaty has enormous potentials for Panama, economically and 
politically, for it prrtt&nes increased Income immediately, offers the ... 
basis for obtaining multi -million dollar loans fro* CS private banks, ' 
will increase business opportunities far Panama merchant*, and reportedly 
will increase employment opportunities in the Canal Zone for Panama na- 
tionals. - 

5. The political control for disbwMwwct of this income la being sought by 
the Junta hut their action must be delnyad until after the Treaty la rati- 
fied by the US or there will be no ratification. Therefore, right n cm 
/early April 1955.7 although the proposed Junta is anxious to get rid of 
Ricardo Arias, they cannot afford to do Without him, for he's like the , 
goose with the golden egg. In fact, it is said that the only way Arias 

is keeping the cabinet fro# robbing the country wholesale is by threaten- 
ing to resign. There are rawpy *watiable pigs who wwat to have more than 
their fill from the government fiscal trough, sod Alias Is certainly hav- 
ing trot&le with the*. • 57 ' ' 7 '**' 

6. Chichi Reman, it will he xwaswbexwd, wes a vex! table dictator because he 
had the police behind Mjs— with which he could back UP bis order*. Ttoto 
Remon, who i* Minister of Co v e . repent and Justice, although the titular 
head of the law and order forces here, with the eonmandey of the Ouardla 
Xaclonal, are on the opposite side of the Zense fro* Ricardo Arias. Arias, 
In other words, does not have the tools to govern with. So such for the 
facts. 

7. A« for the runwra, which cannot be evaluated at the moment £% Apr 55JT 

there are amyt 1 

-• •• : •" ' 

a. It is widely stated that Ramon, was killed for blocking . 
the nefarious drug traffic from Panama to Ruxope and the US. 

Ha la said to barm been cognizant of it and did not stop his co- 
horts from conducting it until the US got busy. It is rumored 
that the US said that if Rawin did not stop the drug traffic, . 
his precious treaty would not be considered by the US. 

b. To Chichi React that tanwty iwis «&' Mjtfi Spot of his 
life, his brain child, his pet project! so he capitulated. Ha 
Issued orders to stop the drug truffle regardless of who got 
hurt— so many officials were asking large sues of money that 
they are said to have Instigated the assassination of Ream. 

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While this sounds welodtwwitie , there h«*» Iwa assurances of am f* st— 
there is narcotic traffic fra* Praam to th* US, and it la bel J*nd that 
on ex-presldent 1* head of the ring and that he has need hi* sons sad. 
political friend* to aid in the distribution not only to the US but to 
Europe. /Tvut foregoing, taken with earlier rswarks, indicates that 
Haroodio Arias is seaut.jT It ia not believed that this is a scheduled 
veeUy or Monthly operation with regular couriers, but rather a business 
of opportunity rtt.h the stalais so hl#i that the cupidity of these local 
politicos is aroused. There is a belief that diplonatie pouch** and of* 
flclal courtesies of the part are Involved. And the swaggliag, of course, 
include* other its** than narcotics. '• ' VSif 


Ex^rresidant He»d(n never permitted anyone, including hieself, to wake 
"treasury raids” on the gavwnwwxt. B* had sad* his pH* while Chief of 
Police so that he could, afford to appear honest as President. Be severely 
censured his cabinet, official* and other* fur trying to vwka "side racmey" 
from the government through dishonest eewfcnwst*, etc. While he cursed 
then publicly far their criminal setlrltlM and so brought hats upon him- 
telf, no one dared to stand up against «c*?restd«nt Benda until 2 Jan 55. 
However, it has beccwe increasingly clear that this rule did not apply to 
private industry— the 'bands la the till” wl*®-fos various officials 
were getting exits fro* hlg business ia Pan* aa in new venture* opening up, 
in getting vrurk done free, etc. .. 


With Chichi Remfa dead, tile officials hoped to gat seme of the g o ve r n me nt 
money which was formerly denied then by Oemnx but Ricardo Arias forbids It. 
These people cenn/vt hear to think Cif the Kill loss under the Treaty Which 
would be available fur stealing if it wwt* not for an honest president. 
Their only answer 1st Don't have an honest president. ’V ■ 


In this connection, the Junta will take care of that if it can get in 
power. And with Colonel VsUarlno cm of its lenders, who can stop it out* 
side of the US? And its clxib will be recurred If and when the US Senate 
ratifies the Treaty. / 


•••v i>: K .->-4 >V>\ •>' 

As for the Oui.muto trial., it wes certainly unprecedented, with the rational 
Assembly, whlcETproclsiwed itself a "court of Jostle*,” finding ex -President 
Jos«f Rnrodh (tulzado guilty of being an accessary to th* assassination of 
President Io»J Antonio Recife cm 2 Jin 5$. dWaado, of course, was sentenced 
to six year*, eight wraiths' inprisanw-nt which will be served at * location 
to be announced by the govern sent. Sbst the trial wsa a "farce", a "political 
frame”, a "crooked piece of work", a "disgraceful travesty" can be heard 
throughout the Isthmus. On* of the local newspaper editors in Psnnsa told 
me "it stinks} the whole trial was crooked." But of course bis n ewsp a per 
did not say so and for the first tin* the reported freedom of the press 
in Panama seems to have disappeared, far usually there Is at least one paper 
which will print th* second side of a Question. Xn this unusual situation the 
papers, the radio and all of th* propaganda, media wax* antl-OwLeado. There 
vas little or no objective reporting and It vw# a "fixed Smtjflr^tsarn the start. 

Actually there vas no Jury, for it waa th* Xatlosal Assembly, a political 
organization like the U3 Congress, which constituted itself a court to hear 
a criminal case} it v«* a poli tical body acting as Judge and Jury ia a crim- 
inal wetter. Hoimal Juridical, principles were thrown out the window. There 
were no witnesses in court; there was no cross -saSKd nation because there 
vas no one there but Otuizado to be rasslned. She trial was conducted by.., 
having the d*po* itions taken fro* scores of people read to the issmbly. ' 


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There vere 53 Assemblymen, of whom lf5 voted to convict end. eight to acquit. 
The depositions vere taken by the Guardla Hacional or by an Investigating 
Cossnittee vhich vas out to "get" Guizado. Some of the statements read as 
"evidence " to the Assembly had already been repudiated by those vho made 
theta. Some of the individuals making these statements had been proved 
liars. But that vas the evidence. Hearsay-evidence vas the principal 
item... hut In this case it vas not even identified as hearsay evidence— 
it vas offered as fact. 

14-. At the trial the principal purported evidence against Guizado vac the eon* 
fesslon of Ruben Klro', the alleged murderer of Reada. Hirrf has changed 
his story a dozen times already but he does not admit, according to the 
police or the Guardi a Hacional, that ha did Uli Retain. The incon- 
sistency of the trial (vhich Panama's outstanding lawyers hare labeled 
"a disgrace to Panama In the eyes of the vorld") is this: In addition to 

Kino, vho says he killed Bem^n, the police are holding 12 other indivi- 
duals (none of them important figures), each of vhom is said to have 
knovn of the plan to kill Renton. Tet none of these individuals has been 
tried nor is slated for trial before July 1955. 

15. Why vas Guizado singled out for attention? It does seem preposterous to 
try an accomplice before trying the murderer and to convict the alleged ac- 
complice on the testimony at the accused murderer. 

16. Also appalling to those attending the trial vere the obvious attempts of the 
government forces to influence the trial — not those controlled by President 
Arias, but those controlled by Minister of Governor and justice Toto n— 
and Commander Vallnrlno. Uniformed Guardia Hacional vere observed handing 
out inflammatory anti -Guizado leaflets and handbills. Aircraft flev lov 
over the Assembly building and dropped lurid handbills vhich the ehildy sm 
and police picked up and distributed within the Assembly meeting vbile 

the trial vas proceeding. 

17. Mrs. Cecelia Pinel de Renin did not attend the trial Itself, but one evening 
she sat outside the Assembly building in the park With a group of poor people. 
Many wondered if it vas by chance that she vas "discovered" by the press 
photographer so that the papers had her picture on the f ro nt page, grieving 
for her husband in public, as hit mental assassin vas being tried. Actually 
this vas scheduled vith the press. She vhole performance mads a bad impres- 
sion on any unprejudiced individual vho attended the trial or even studied 
it. All the Spanish radio stations carried the entire proceedings end the 
vhols Panama nation listened to it via radio— there being BO W In Panama. 

18. Even the people vho Vera overwhelmingly opposed to Guizado at the start of 
the trial vere so deluged vith propaganda that they ‘Awakened to it and asked 
"vhy"j "vho is forcing this propaganda on us?" and "Why?” 

19. The most careful observers do not think that Guizado is an innocent man but 
they think he may be one of several cabinet ministers and prominent officials 
vho planned to remove Reada because the latter vas p r eve n ting them frost racket- 
eering. There is no reason to believe that Guizado contemplated violence, 

far less assassination, in removing Readaj for there have been many bloodless 
coups in Panama, where actually no president in 19 years has served a full 
four-year term. These observers believe that Guizado vas implicated but 
that he is being made the goat for all the rest) and no one can say who, if 
any, contemplated murder to get rid of Rtradn. Apparently the Assembly had to 
convict Guizado to be sure he did not regain the presidency. After ell, he 
vas never formally removed until after his trial; p re vi ously he had been only 
suspended. If found not guilty he would hove resumed the executive power. 

Tho Assevfljly had to Justify Its preeipiate action of l£ Jan 55 when it im- 
peached Guizado, suspended him and arrested him and held him incommunicado 
from family or lawyers, all on the flimsiest of circumstantial evidence. 

While they probably did right, they certainly had no legal basis for doing 
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' APPROVED FOR RELEASE • 1 , 



DATE: JAN 2006 

; ; ■ ^ . , 


CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 

This material contains Information affecting ths lta* 
tlonst Defenae of the United flutes within the menu- 


INFORMATION REPORT 

Int of the Keplonsge Laws, TUI# IB, U.8.0, Bees. TW 
•nd 7*4, th« transmission or revelation of which in 


any manner to an unauthorised person U prohibited 
bylaw. V 


- 

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. ' 





COUNTRY Panama 

SUBJECT Rub on MIRO Repudiates His Confession 

DATE OF INFO. 7 February 19?? '■■■' ??:■■ 

PLACE ACQUIRED I 


REPORT NO. , 

DATE DISTR. - 17 February 19 ?? 

NO. OF PAGES ’ 1 

REQUIREMENT NO. RD (b)(1) ' 
REFERENCES .'r •" ' (3) "-r 





THt SOUlC 

mi aahaisal oi co mint is rnturtvi. 
nos air sti ttvitui 



On 7 February 19?? the National Assembly Investigating Committee took Ruben 
MIRO to the scene of the RiMON assassination, where he was asked to reconstruct 
the crime. At this point MIRO said that he did not murder REMON, and that he 
was forced to confess by Bolivar VALLARINO, Chief of the Guardia Nacional. 

On | |February 19?? Francisco ALVARADO, the original prosecuting attorney, 
said that he originally suggested to VALLARINO that the latter threaten the 
safety of MIRO's family in order to obtain a confession. VALLARINO did 
so and MRO immediately confessed. : 



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Tkit nntil mf»te> M<*tn»M~. t«<mla« <t« Nttk— •) Drtml M At. CaM BW • «<*!■ Or. wwiiMi « 'At R¥U»Mff 'X»wk'vT^» , 

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SEC/ET, 


COUNTRY panama 

SUBJECT Ration lata At tern t to Assassinate 
Ruben 0. THRO Guard!* 



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REPORT NO .' 1 . . 

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DATE OISTR. ' *. September 19$8, 




NOw- PAGES .. 2 , j tonli 

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REFERENCES RD '■ ... ' ' (g! . 

, ■■ V ‘‘ ■' ■ -' J s< . . : - •' •;" • 5v h' \ ' . • . »■* 


ineo.° F 5 August 1958 


PLACE A 
DATE ACQ. 



SOURCE EVALUATIONS ABE DEFINITIVE. APPRAtSAt OP CONTENT IS TENTATIVE. • 





A group of Renonlstas wore behind the unsuccessful Attempt on lj August 
1958 to assassinate Ruben 0. .MUtO Ouardia, the Panamanian lawyer who \ ■ 
was acquitted of the assassination of President Jose Antonio REHON i||||J§|§§& 
Cantors. 

The following Renonlstas, supporters of Alejandro REMOH Cantera/brothcr ' ‘ 3 
of deceased President REM ON , were behind the attempt on HIRO's life*:; 

Efraln Barnett, a pro-Alejandro REHON deputy in the Rational Asscnblyi ''V',; Y- 
Honrique de ODARRIO, Aletandro'REMON's brother-in-law and presbttnfeonernl ^ • 
rntruiZI? . tf . VM_B,ag©» Naj&onalg Diogenee Albert* PIRO, president of the T K f! 
Rational Assembly^ Oonoroso Simons, a prominont monixsr of the Partido 
Coalicion Patriotica Slacional (PCPtl)/«» well as ft trusted confidant of 
deceased President RENONj and Victor D'ANEILO, a member of tho PCPtJ. .■ * ‘ ft f -Y 1 


Honero VELASQUEZ received the money froo the Remonista group and arranged , 
for Thelma King, a close personal friend of Alejandro REM3M, to make . :T'\ 
final arrangenenta with and pay tho actual gunmen. l.^The poreoha'Kiftg'3fi|i^S 
hlrod wore William PUIO and Carlos Rowe*\s?,W : Mi¥* 


Li. TGRO had boon warned, about a month age by a personal friend who bad : f 
learned of certain activities of Alejandro CUELLAR Arosonena and Alborto 
C’JKLLAR Aroseneraf RlTcifriend told him to avoid frequenting certain , j 
places at certain times because his life was in danger.^, 

5. While THRO fearod an attempt on his life would be cade at soee tine, ho 

did :iot feel that it would occur eoonoanlt was KIRO’s belief that there 
wo -ild probably be trouble in Panama if President Ernesto DS LA OUARPIA Jr. 
were to attend a "summit conference" at tho United Rations, and that any 
attennt on his life would probably be made at that tins. • i '■■■<' 

■ • • • - ‘ „ y-\ i ..." 

6. MRO had applied for permission to leave the country) but had been re- 
quested to rephrase his petition and to show his brother's acknowledgement 
as sponsor. UIRO had prepared t!» petition and had gone to his brother's 
hoae for his signature, lie had Just left his brother Ricardo's hooa 


4 

x 

./('j 




7 . 

n. 



and had entered Ills ear and was nested behind the wheel when the '\ : : V 
shooting began* MTRO saw neither the other ear nor the g u nmen^ 

but recall* haring heard the voices of two men ae the other car drove ■ 
away. As soon as the other car hod driven away,' KBtQ sat up and 
drove away, not realising where or how seriously fuO! hod been wounded, 
tie did not try to fallow tho other ear but thought only of getting 
to a hospital, • : ' r - r ^ 

MTRO Ins node no statements forth# Guar 10 Haclcml (GM) or for the % 
Policia Socreta Doalonol (rSN), lie did, however, give the name of . 
PUIO and Rowe to llemogeneo OK I«A ROSA, Attorney. General of Pan'na* 


MTRO | feels his request to leave the country 

will To granted*, and ho piano to loavo as soon os possible, although 
ho has os yet not decided where to go*’ lie boliovos that another v 5 r - 
attempt on ids life will bo made if lie is in Panama when there is any 
kind of trouble, 


Comments 


All of tlteeo man have traceable close relationship# ’ with each^ - - . 
other and with Alejandro REMON, who is a svornmortal snery ofo'^r 
MJRO. Ml HO' originally confessed to 'tho assassination of President 
RSKON but later retracted his confession and 'was ultimately acquitted 
of the crime. ’4 ? 

Homej'o VELASQUEZ iua a record of involvement in anU-goveri*nent 

violence . Rowe was once 
ttUlon .di^siohlor^ths?'^^. 

.. . ,,, _ ti ^^ltorteiWllllam^, Ptf !&#; 

was listed as, a P5N Colon division dfove sfy gatt>r>|${ 

that Rowo And his man agemcn t "of -thtf P^N’^^lort'^VlsionvWors greatly • ; 
influenced by Thelma King, a political opportunist Of. long standing. X.- ' 
Tho Panama t'ity press has reported the^arrSpt/ ; inUrrogation^ahd 
detention of Rows and FOIO'i' 

*' *•••',; 'H- •:'*•• 

. •••-' * •'■• , ■ r, . 4 $-/ ‘ ■ , v 

Tho Fanem* *'ity press has reported the arrest- and detention 'of V. 

Alberto ClIKLlAR Aros^ena, ,one of. the'tan. who^'Shared lh th® Ip > ; yat--r'- ; V • •'• 
government's $9), 000 reward for the assassin of President RSMON. ; ; 
CUELLAR nuppliod infomation vhich lsd to the arrest of MIRO 'ahd/^^k-j,,", 
he later teat! fled against MIRO a ttha.' latter' e'- trial.- ’ 

- - .■■■«: fi&i- i 


plotting, illicit arms deals,' ani 
(December 19 U 9 to August 19 J> 0 )iW 
Policia Seci-et* Noolonal (PSH),|i 


A-'.ikA •> 





Re: Caribbean Political arc Revolutio.-iary Activities 

Involving Cuba, Panama , Domic: lean Republic, Nicaragua 


On the evening of [May 11, 1959, MM T-2^who has 
furnished reliable information in the past, reported as 
follows: 

On May 11 , 1959, JOSEPH r/mEROLA of Miami B^ach, 
accompanied by two unidentified men suspected byjjMM T-2Lpf 
being hoodlums, contacted ROLANDO MASFERRER, former Cuban 
Senator and newspaper publisher, now living in exile in Miami. 

MEfROLA disclosed to MASFERRER that he had just 
tetunied to Miami from Cuba where he had been in close contact 
with .CARLOS PRIO SOC ARRAS . exiled fencer president of Cuba, 
and also with both FIDEL ard RAUL CASTRO and their sisters. 

MEROLA f'-Id MASFERRER that RAUL CASTRO, who is 
commander in chief of the armed forces, CESAR VEGA and 
RUBEN MIRO,were in on «. rty meeting held concerning the 
recent expedition of. Cubans against Panama. MEROLA stated 
that RAUL CASTRO ccaeei-'ed the plan to invade Panama. MEROLA 
said that MIRO, a Panama r.iart instrumental in planning the 
expedition, had subsequently been taken into a"sort of 
custody* by the. Cuban government in order to prevent him from 
directing and disclosing to the public the real facts 
concerning Cuban participation in this planned invasion. 

MEROLA told MASFERRER that RAUL CASTRO plans to 
"kick out" Major PEDRO LUIS DIAZ LANZ, Chief of the Cuban 
Air Force, and his brother MARCOS DIAZ, his assistant, 
along with Captain ANTONIO SANSON, also a member of the 
Cuban Air Force. MEROLA stated that RAUL CASTRO is accusing 
these three men of accepting commissions unlawfully in 
connection with the purchase of sons airplanes by the Cuban 
government. SANSON will allegedly be executed on RAUL 
CASTRO&orders to prove to the Cuban public that the CASTRO 
government punishes its own people as well as others for their 
crimes . 



PAGE TWO 


RUFFO ESCORTED BY AGENT TO * RESTLESS II - AND POINTED OUT TO AGENT 
GAS TANK HE " PRESUMED * WAS INSTALLED MARCH NINETEEN FIFTYNINE. 

RUFFO DID NOT SEE ACTUAL INSTALLATION BUT SAW MEN WORKING ON GAS LINES 
LEADING THERETO. U. S. CUSTOMS, MIAMI, OF BELIEF THIS TANK WAS ABOARD 
VESSEL AT TIME OF SEIZURE DEC., FIF TYEIGHT. RUFFO CHIMED MET TWO 
WHITE MALES, SPANISH SPEAKING INDIVIDUALS, NEAR * RESTLESS II * 

EVENING APRIL THIRTEEN, LAST, ONE OF THEM ALLEGEDLY NAMED 
A MAZOLA* END_ QU6£E -(PHONETIC ^ CONVERSED WITH RUFFO AND AMONG OTHER 

THINGS MENTIONED RUBEN MIRO AND OTHER PANAMANIANS. THIS PERSON CLAIMED 
HE WAS GOING TO JACKSONVILLE, FLA., APRIL FIFTEEN, FOR MEETING, NATURE 
UNKNOWN TO RUFFO, AND INVITED R'JFKO TO GO ALONG. RUFFO UNABLE TO GO 
BECAUSE OF WORK COMMITMENT . RUFFO CLAIMS THERE WAS NO CONVERSATION 
RE ARMS, REVOLUTIONS, OR POSSIBLE PARTICIPATION " RESTLESS II * ON 

,i A 

PART THESE INDIVIDUALS, BUT RUFFO STATED THESE PERSONS QBffFE CAPABLE 
EWP-'S-yOi-E OF REVOLUTIONARY ACTIVITIES. RUFFO ADMITTED DISCUSSING THIS 
MATTER WITH PANAMANIAN AMBASSADOR. RUFFO ADMITTED HEARING REPORTS IN 
PANAMA IN FEB. NINETEEN FIFTYNINE, THAT ROBERTO SAMUDIO, PANAMANIAN 
REVOLUTIONARY, WAS IN MIAMI, ATTEMPTING TO BUY ARMS. RUFFO CLAIMS 
HE HAS NO FIRST HAND INFO THAT ROBERTO SAMUDIO IS, OR WAS, IN MIAMI, 
ALTHOUGH RUFFO ADMITTED DISCUSSING THIS INDIVIDUAL WITH PANAMANIAN 
AMBASSADOR. 



END PAGE TWO 



. cowronjATJoH or 

DISPATCH 


AMMIJC- I think* that Taraer ha* a radla eparalor, hat 
doa* not discount the potalblllty that Tamar hloteir 
operate* the radio. The DCI eoatldar* Tamar eapabla 
and apt for the araed struggle In Panada. >SIMIC-1 
know* nothing of Turner'* brother* (David of VAN 
and another In Mexico). Other than Tamer and Thalaa 
King ARMl'C-t doe* not know of my other 00 1 contact* 
of VAN. . - ; . 

r - / ^ * ' /' 

'IOII-AuIjL - Coneern^Thelaa King, oho hat bate a 

'CIS tlngletan agent for aura than two years and/ It 
considered bjr CIS to be a* excellent agent. H^r 
FI coverage of the i'anaaanlen Conqrett and the Canal 
/.one (the I* considered to have excellent lettuce* 
within tho /.one) hat been lengthy and detal/ed; daring 
the January l*>M critlt *he tent o*ny repory* back to 
llahana, Including a large number of photograph*. The 
majority of her report* are tent to her acdodaodat 1 o n 
address in Mexico City. She **** radio eofaasuleation 
for argent matter* only. While *hn wa* s'aedber of 
Congrott, the 0C1 alio eonelderori her aa.a political 
action agent. when Thelma King want* aAersonal 
neetlng In Mexico with Rogello Rodrigee*. tha Caban 
Cate Officer In the Eobatiy, the write /In S/» to her 
accommoda t i on addrett In Mexleo City Indicating date 
and tide of the propoted deetlng. AIT tb* ••(Jj.’lL, 
arc bold a.1 the Kendo de la Celtara, /seer' |I61 1 \ 

deetlng*/ aeobrdl nfl Tc 


! kelJ <1 _____ 

lnfo| v )| Theae peraonal deetlng*/ aeoirdlnf To 
AdMuWl . are fer the perpote of Tholia receiving fend* 
for VAN. not for herteif. Tamer mdy al*o have a 
funding channel Independent ef Theld*. AMMU6- 1 
doe* not know If Theloa ha* ever hid courier 
commit n I ca 1 1 on with Rogello; he believe* that the ha* 
ont. AMMIIG-I think* that her letter communication I* 
one-way (to Mexico); that her radio coodinl ea t I oa la^ 
Infrequent via the Tomer radio (to ond froo Haban*).' •. 
AM MUG- 1 know* of three lettera donlalnlng S/W that 
tholda ha* written to Mexico, ^he "Cato Sonia" I* 
handled by the Ue p a r l amen to Illegal, bet Theloa 
alto haa close relation* wl III Abe LN (AMMUC-1** 
department), a* doe* Jorge Tomer. She he* a good 
code and good S/k system. SJke doe* not know how to 
operate a radio. Shn end Jorge Turner ote the tame 
radio code and her me* * age*' are transmitted via hi* 
radio. Thelma and Turner Nave been trained by the 
OGI in operational technique* (e.’J. */w, etc.) only . 

She ha* not received *ub*tantlve political action 

or agent training?! ,S: .. 17*. • >**>'•". ’* i\t . 

fhc OG1 aupports VAN becauae^Yt l"* 1 1 *1 Vi t a n t 4 grouf" 
and I* for the "lack* armada." AMMUG-1 believe* that 
the UGI has contacts within lh#,-,P tr 1 1 do del Pueblo_ (POP) 
but doe* not know Identities. ,*■>(<.., ..j.. ^ __ 

*. ,rr .* / ,j, r> c > 

AMMt'G-l stated that he believe* that arms had been “ 
spirited Into Guatemala and Veneauelpi (as well a* 
funds, of course) for use by the 13 November guerrilla 
group and the FALK respectively, but that the Cubans 
bad furnished fund* to VAN in Panama, the FLN in 
Nicaragua and I'KAM In El Salvador, for the l ocal 
purchaac of arms and ammunition. AKMf’G- I was not able 
to elaborate on this. 


(COK TINTED ) 






Instigated the recent incidents in Panama, although the Communists were 
quLek to exploit the situation once it arose. CIA succeeded In photographing 
13 Castro-ites who were engaged in fomenting the incident nicer it started. 

Of a total of 45 Communist Castro-ites involved, 13 had been trained in Cuba, 
and they distributed leaflets and disseminated propaganda over the radio. 

CIA also learned that one Thelma King personally led a mob of Panamanians 
in the streets. Dr. Longer wondered if Panamanians and the world at large 
are aware that radio stations in Panama were in the hands of the Communists. 
General Carter replied that one f.ould not 6 ay that precisely, but it can be 
said chat 30 minutes after the incident began there were inflamatory broad- 
casts on the air. As for Che sniper activity. General Carter said that one 


sniper had been identified as a known Communist. 

With regard to Vietnam, General Carter said that the bloodless coup 
which began yesterday afternoon was accomplished by a group of young generals 
who arc pro-Amcrican and anti-neutralist. General hhanh is the leader. 
Gencrel Khin, 3rd Corps Commander, will be chief of staff. The coup group 
had been plugging for more counter-insurgency effort against the Viet Cong, 
and the new leaders will take stronger action. General Khanh has said that 
he will look to U. S. Ambassador Lodge for guidance on political matters in 
the immediate Saigon area. 

General Carter said that CIA had received advance information from 
General Khanh that he was worried about French moves with respect to 
Vietnam. (In enswer to Mr. Coyne’s question as to whether CIA had been 
back of yesterday's coup, General Carter replied that it is well known that 
the CIA does not instigate coups.) Mr. Murphy, noting the conspiratorial 

liANulfc Via ONLY 




TKftSKRETr.